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CITY OF NORTH TONAWANDA 
CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 




Made with pride 
in Western 
hew York. 




www. dunloptire. com 




FLANIGAN Chevrolet • GEO 




SALES . SERVICE . PARTS 



CHEVROLET HAS BEEN SERVING NORTH TON AMANDA 
AT THIS LOCATION FOR OVER YEARS 



CONGRATULATIONS 
NORTH TON AW AN DA! 





Goodwrench Service 

We want your business 




— Hours — 

Mon., Tues. & Thurs. 

9 am - 9 pm 

Wed., & Fri. 9 am - 6 pm 
Saturday 9 am- 5 pm 



27 Main St., 

N. Tonawanda, NY 



693-8600 








PARISH SCHOOLS 

EDUCATING NORTH TONA WANDA SINCE 1 903 

then 

Ascension School — est. 1 907 
Our Lady of Czestochowa School — est. 1 903 
St. Joseph School — est. 1947 



now 

OLC Campus (PreSchool-Gr.2) 57 Center Ave 
St. Joseph Campus (Grade 3-5) 1 469 Payne Ave 
Ascension Campus (Grade 6-8) 75 Keii st 

Pre School (3 yr old)--2 afternoons 
PreSchool (4 yr old)-5 mornings 
PreSchool (4 yr old)-3 afternoons 
FULL DAY KINDERGARTEN 
Grades 1 -8 

+ class sizes limited to 1 8 students in PreSchool through Grade 2 
+ NYS certified teachers (a total of 1 88 years experience) 

+ Art, Music, Ubrary Skills, Physical Education Programs 
+ Computers in each PreSchool through Grade 5 classroom for daily use 
+ Computer instruction beginning in Grade 3 (Macintosh and IBM Labs) 

+ Second Language program 
+ After School program 
+ Full Remedial and Enrichment program 
+ Complete Sports Program 

+ Bussing provided to eliglible students from N.T., Niagara Wheatfield, and Starpoint 

INSTRUCTION IN CATHOLIC FAITH 
AND LIVING CHRISTIAN VALUES THROUGHOUT CURRICULUM 

accepting registrations for most PreSchool and Kindergarten through 6th grade classes 






CONTINUING EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION 

Main Office 693-2828 



Participating Parishes: 

Ascension, Our Lady of Czestochowa, St. Albert, St. Joseph 




MAYOR: 



JAMES A. MCGINNIS 



COMMON COUNCIL 
PRESIDENT: 


DANIEL J. CUDZILO 


FIFTH WARD 


ALDERMEN: 


CATHERINE G. SCHWANDT 
LEONARD J. WUDYKA 
MARY LOU PIEPER 
KAREN D. MANGEL 


FIRST WARD 
SECOND WARD 
THIRD WARD 
FOURTH WARD 


CITY TREASURER: 


LESLIE J. STOLZENFELS 




CITY ATTORNEY: 


JEFFREY N. MIS 




CITY COURT JUDGE 


RICHARD C. KLOCH, SR. 





CIVIL SERVICE OR APPOINTED CITY OFFICIALS 



CITY ACCOUNTANT: 

CITY BUILDING INSPECTOR: 

CITY ASSESSOR: 

CITY CLERK: 

CITY ENGINEER: 

CODE ENFORCEMENT/PLUMBING: 
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: 
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT: 

FIRE DEPARTMENT: 

VITAL STATISTICS: 

POLICE DEPARTMENT: 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT: 
RECREATION/PARKS/YOUTH: 
WASTEWATER TREATMENT: 
WATER DEPARTMENT: 



DAVID R. JAKUBASZEK 
MICHAEL R. EISENHAUER 
BRIAN M. HESS 
JOHN W. WYLUCKI 
DALE W. MARSHALL 
STEPHEN R. KURBIEL 
MICHELE A. TOW 
CHARLES R. FLEISCHMAN 
DAVID A. ROGGE 
PATRICIA H. YAHR 
LLOYD C. GRAVES 
GARY J. FRANKLIN 
JOHN P. SILSBY 
PAUL J. DROF 
PAUL F. MCDONOUGH 



THE BIRTH OF 

THE CITY OF NORTH TONAWANDA 



1777: The New York State Constitution was adopted in 1777, with the City of Kingston named 

the State Capital. In 1797, the City of Albany was made the State Capital. 

1808: Niagara County was established on March 11 , 1808 . It was originally part of Genesee 

County. Buffalo was the county seat. 

1821: Erie County was established on April 2 , 1821 . It was originally part of Niagara County. 

The northern boundary included that territory of land of the old Niagara County, south of the 
middle of Tonawanda Creek. 

1836: The Town of Tonawanda was established on April 16 , 1836 . It was originally part of 

Town of Buffalo and included Grand Island, which became a township in 1852 . 

1836: The Town of Wheatfield was established on May 12 , 1836 . 

1857: The Village of Tonawanda had the unique position of being in two counties. The three 

wards south of Tonawanda Creek (current the City of Tonawanda) were in Erie county and the 
forth ward on the north side (currently the City of North Tonawanda), was in Niagara County. The 
boundaries which form the ward on the north side of the Village of Tonawanda were: the Niagara 
River, Tonawanda Creek, Division (Mile) Street and Wheatfield Street. There were frequent 
disputes over which side of the creek should receive the most improvements. The "Gravel 
Incident", involved a dispute over the transportation of gravel from the gravel pit at Thompson 
Street and Payne Avenue (located behind the current North Tonawanda City Hall) to repair roads 
in the Wards located across Tonawanda Creek (currently the City of Tonawanda). After the 
separation, the settlement became a part of the Town of Wheatfield. 

1865: An act was introduced in the New York State Legislature on May 8 , 1865 , incorporating 

the Village of North Tonawanda. The name "Village of Niagara" was originally considered and 
used for a short period of time, however, there was already a City of Niagara Falls and a Town 
of Niagara, so the name North Tonawanda was finally chosen. The boundaries were increased 
to the present size of the City of North Tonawanda. It had a population of 440 people. The 
villages of Martinsville and Gratwick were annexed to North Tonawanda. 

1897: As the lumber business and other industrial ventures grew, their was a requirement for 

additional municipal services to support the expanding Village. A movement to become a City 
arose, which caused quite a bit of political wrangling. Finally, an act was introduced in the New 
York State Legislature on April 24, 1897, incorporating the City of North Tonawanda. Albert E. 
Keen, Village President, became the first Mayor. The sidewalks were made of wooden blanks 
and the streets were gravel. 



CITY OFFICIALS - 1997 

standing: CHESTER R. KLIMEK - Deputy City Clerk, DANIEL J. CUDZILO - Common Council President, JAMES A. McGINNIS - Mayor 
LEONARD J. WUDYKA - Second Ward Alderman, JEFFREY N. MIS - City Attorney, JOHN W. WYLUCKI - City Clerk 
seated: LESLIE J. STOLZENFELS - City Treasurer, MARY LOU PEEPER - Third Ward Alderman, KAREN D. MANGEL - Fourth Ward Alderman 

CATHERINE G. SCHWANDT - First Ward Alderman 











Albert E. McKeen 

1897 



Jaco!) Y. Smealon 

1898 



. Cooke Oille 

1899-1902 




Henry Smoycr 

1903-4 



James P. Mackenzie 

1903-6 1926-27 



Eugene de Kleist 

1907-8 




Louis T. Fick 

1909-12 



John A. Kafler 

1913-14 



Benjamin L. Rand 

1915-18 








John E. 'Wallace 
1936-37 1940-43 



Myles W. Joyce 
1938-39 1944-47 

1952-55 1960-61 



CITY OF 
NORTH 
TONAWANDA 



Frederick B. Durkee 

1956-57 1963-66 






Henry P. Smith ID 

1962 



Paul A Rumbold 

1967-1971 




William C. Wlttkowsky 

1976-1979 



Elizabeth C. Hoffman 

1980-1992 




Stanley M. Rosinskl 

1948-51 




John F. Kopczynsld 
195 8-59 




Edward S. Wlater 

1972-1975 




James A. McGinnis 
1993-1997 






CITY OF NORTH TONAWANDA FACTS 



The City of North Tonawanda, located midway between Buffalo and Niagara Falls, is the second 
largest community in the County of Niagara, and the 15 largest city out of 62 in the State of New York. The 
1990 population, according to The United States Census Bureau was 34,989. North Tonawanda has a land 
area of 10.5 square miles. The City’s infrastructure includes 118 miles of paved highways, 121 miles of 
sanitary sewers and 60 miles of storm sewers. The perimeter of the City is 13.5 miles, 9.26 miles of which 
is waterfront. There are 244 acres of wetlands within the 6,830 acres which comprise the total area of the 
City. It is located 566 feet above sea level and has an annual temperature of 46.8 degrees and an average 
rainfall of 36 inches. Moody's Investor Service, a New York City firm that rates governments, gave North 

Tonawanda an A rating on our debt, the only City in Western New York to have 
that high a rating. The City is served by Conrail, NFTA bus lines, the Buffalo and 
Niagara Falls Airports, the New York State Thruway and major county and state 
highways. Two prominent water resources serve as Municipal boundaries: the 
New York State Barge Canal (Tonawanda Creek) on the south and the Niagara 
River on the west. 




Subject to the provisions of the State Constitution, the City operates 
pursuant to its Charter and various other laws applicable to the City. The 
Legislative power of the City is vested in the Common Council which consist of 
five Aldermen, all of whom are elected concurrently for a two-year term. The 
Mayor is also elected for a two-year term. Electricity and natural gas are supplied 
throughout the City by Niagara Mohawk Power 
Corporation and National Fuel Gas, respectively. Sanitary sewer collection, treatment 
and disposal facilities are maintained by the City. The City also maintains its own 
water supply and distribution system. In reference to public safety, the City maintains 
a central police headquarters, an emergency management office, and seven fire 
stations. Garbage, street repair and snow plowing are some of the major functions 
performed by the Department of Public Works. In the area of recreation, the City 
maintains 2 swimming pools, 17 playgrounds, 13 tennis courts, 1 1 softball diamonds, 

13 hardball diamonds, 5 major parks, a youth center and an 18 hole golf course. 



Historically, North Tonawanda has been an important regional manufacturing 1X0111,1 IorslAWANDA 
center. The City's strategic location at the confluence at the Erie Canal (now called 
the Barge Canal) encouraged the development of a strong industrial corridor along 
the waterfront and on Tonawanda Island, which is accessible by both vehicular and 
rail traffic. Major shopping centers are easily accessible. We are now focusing on the Tourist trade to 
include Canal Fest, the Herschell Factory Complex, the Carnegie Cultural Center, the Rivera Theater and 
a major commitment by, New York State, to develop the Tonawandas' canal shoreline and harbor. 





Albert Smith 




George Smith 




Fred Root 



CITY COURT 
JUDGES 




Howard Praker 



On April 24, 1897 the Village of North 
Tonawanda was incorporated into a 
city. In the 100 years since then, the 
voters have elected ten City Judges. 





Edward Harrington 




J. Theodore Moses 




Katherine Rowley Lautz 




Richard C. Kloeh, Sr. 








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Aerial View of the Tonawanda Iron Works and the 
International Paper Company on Tonawanda Island, c. 1960 




CENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 




Robert and Marigail Sondel: Robert and Marigail are Co-Chairmen of our Centennial 

Committee. Robert currently serves as Assistant City Attorney and is a life-long resident 
of North Tonawanda. In 1974 he married Marigail, then a Buffalo resident, and she also 
fell in love with the City. Both Bob and Marigail are active in area organizations and are 
interested in keeping North Tonawanda the outstanding community that it is. 




Front Row: David Jakubaszek, Bob Sondel, Marigail Sondel, Sandy Wurl 
Back Row: Joe Duval, William Miles, Nancy Bolduc, Cathy Schwant 




Front Row: Sally Ann Glynn, Judith Kay Miller, Mildred Olscamp, Rosemary Gugino 
Back Row: Alexander B. Soos, Charles Gugino, Walter G. Miller, Keith Lemke, 

Dale S. Rogers, William Miles, Pat Sinnott, Fred Wisniewski 

Absent: Charlie Fleischman, Elizabeth Robson, Terry Shaw, Rae Proefrock, Dan Killian, 
Dr. Robert Chick, Richard Keil, Paula Barnard, Kelly Simon, Dan Haight 




CENTENNIAL BIRTHDAY PARTY COMMITTEE 




Maryalice Demler: Maryalice, our Birthday Party Mistress of Ceremonies, is a North 

Tonawanda native. Currently a television news anchor for WGRZ, Channel 2 in Buffalo, 
she is an honors graduate of Niagara University. A former Miss New York State, she is 
a volunteer with the T.O.Y.S. Program, Canal Fest and other community organizations. 
Maryalice and her husband, Nate Marton, make their home in North Tonawanda. 




Front Row: MaryLou Pieper, Jean Jakubaszek, Ellyn Broeker 
Back Row: Chairman David Jakubaszek, Mary Brenzel, 

Leslie Stolzenfels, Norman Alexander. 



Additional Thank-You's to: Wegmans Food Market on Niagara Falls Blvd. and Tops 

Friendly Market on Nash Road for their donations of the birthday cake. Also, Richard 
Keil, Frank Keller, Jerry Waldkoetter, Irene Niese Riemer, Judy Ellman, Cathy Gambino, 
Charlie Fleischman, the Common Council, Board of Education, Tonawanda News, and all 
others who contributed to the success of our Centennial book and birthday party. 



CENTENNIAL 




Left to Right: Michele Tow, David Jakubaszek, Sandra Wurl 



COMMITTEE 



BOOK 



David R. Jakubaszek: David is the City Accountant and Chairman of the Centennial 

Birthday Party. The son of Theodore and Helen, he is a life-long resident of North 
Tonawanda. He received a bachelor's degree in Business Administration from Gannon 
University and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the United States Army. David 
and his wife, Jean, have four children: Jennifer, Michael, Thomas and Joseph. 



Sandra A. Wurl: Sandra has worked in the city's Community Development Office since 
1986. Her experience in assisting with grant applications helped in the production of this 
book. Sandy is proud of her family name and heritage. She was surprised to learn that, 
in 1843, Edmund Wurl was one of the purchasers of land that became "Martinsville," her 
home town, and that Martin Wurl sat on the first City Council in 1897. 



Michele A. Tow: As Community Development Director, Michele enjoys working with 

residents to preserve the City's historic treasures. Born in Cleveland, Ohio, she has 
degrees from Ohio Wesleyan University and SUNY at Buffalo. 



THANKS FOR YOUR INVALUABLE ASSISTANCE WITH RESEARCH, PHOTOS 
AND WRITING, AND YOUR SHARP RECOLLECTIONS OF OUR HISTORY 



Willard B. Dittmar: Willard is president of the Historical Society of the Tonawandas, 
formed in 1961. The Society's Museum opened in 1964 in the old New York Central 
Railroad Station, where he is Curator and Exhibit Director. Mr. Dittmar is also Historian 
for the City of Tonawanda. Willard worked in the Engineering Department of Remington 
Rand Corporation on Main Street in the City of Tonawanda for 35 years. 



Elizabeth Robson: Elizabeth, North Tonawanda Historian, is shown in costume during 
the 1995 T-NT Days at the Heritage Coalition booth. A school teacher at Col. Payne for 
many years, Ms. Robson taught the first grade and fourth grade, where the curriculum of 
local history encouraged her to explore the rich history of the Tonawandas region. She 
belongs to the Historical Society of the Tonawandas, as well as other Historical 
Societies. 



Janet McKenna: Janet, reference librarian at the North Tonawanda Public Library from 
1971-96, helped a generation of North Tonawandans do research. Mrs. McKenna is an 
alumna of Syracuse University and SUNY at Buffalo. She was a founding member of 
Literacy Volunteers of North Tonawanda and has served on the boards of directors of the 
Historical Society of the Tonawandas and the YWCA of the Tonawandas. 




Left to Right: Elizabeth Robson, Willard Dittmar, Janet McKenna 




NORTH TONAWANDA CENTENNIAL CALENDAR 



January 4, 1997 
April 24, 1997 
April 24, 1997 
April 25, 1997 
June 14 and 15, 1997 
July 3, 1997 
July 4, 1997 
July 5, 1997 
July 6, 1997 
July 20, 1997 
October 4, 1997 



Beard and Moustache contest registration begins 

First-day cancellation from the Post Office goes on sale 

Birthday party at the North Tonawanda High School Auditorium 

Shrine Chanters Centennial Music Program sponsored by ZONTA 

Garage Sale of the Century 

Musical Celebration of the 100th Anniversary 

Fireworks to commemorate the City's Centennial 

Dedication of Heritage Park 

Centennial Parade 

Beard and moustache judging at Canalfest 
Oktoberfest at Gratwick Hose Hall 




NORTH TONAWANDA 




Aerial View of North Tonawanda and Tonawanda Island, c. 1957 




ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF HISTORY 



Five great bodies of water with their connecting rivers and streams have shaped the history of 
Western New York and North Tonawanda in particular for centuries. The four great Ice Ages scooped out 
valleys and deposited rocks and gravel in certain places when they melted. As they receded they left the 
Great Lakes. Animals which had wandered south to escape the cold gradually returned so that the lakes 
were teeming with fish and the forests home for deer, bear, beaver and many other animals. 

This wilderness area was attractive to the human beings who began to inhabit the Western 
Hemisphere. They needed water to live, food was abundant, and moving from place to place was fairly easy 
by boat, however fragile the craft. It is believed that they migrated from Asia across the Bering Strait to 
Alaska and dispersed through the continent east and south. The people who settled here were the Neuters, 
so-called by the French fur traders when they began to come through in the early 16th century. There were 
a few small villages scattered through this area. Some artifacts were found on Tonawanda Island which may 
be from a people who predated the Neuters. 

Most of the Indians in New York State were Senecas, Cayugas, Onondagas, Oneidas and Mohawks. 
They lived further east. The Mohawks were the Keepers of the Eastern Door near the Hudson River. The 
Onondagas were the Keepers of the Council Fire, and the Senecas were the Keepers of the Western Door. 
These nations were constantly at war with each other until they agreed to join in the Iroquois League. Then 
other nations who would not join them became the enemy. The Hurons, Neuters and the Eries who lived 
in what we call Ohio were attacked, killed, adopted, or dispersed. There was so much fighting in the area 
that it became known as the "dark and bloody ground." The Senecas, whose homes were chiefly near the 
Genesee River, only came to this area to hunt and fish. 

Explorers from Europe began coming through here in the early sixteen hundreds, first the French 
"voyageurs" and then the English, traders all, mostly in furs. The Tonawandas were not very significant at 
first except for the stream that had to be crossed: the Ton-e-wan-ta which means "swift water." The Indians 
for many years had a trail for portaging between Lake Ontario and Lake Erie which went between the present 
Lewiston and Buffalo to by-pass the Falls and the rapids. 

The conflict between the French and the English finally erupted into the French and Indian War, won 
by the British. The victors took over Fort Niagara, Fort Schlosser above the Falls, and the trail along the 
Niagara River. They called it the Military Road. In North Tonawanda it followed quite closely the present 
River Road, Webster Street, and went by pontoon bridge or ferry across Tonawanda Creek to the present 
Main Street in Tonawanda. The remnants of that Military Road still exist in Niagara Falls and from the 
southern boundary of Tonawanda to Grant Street in Buffalo. 

The British began making improvements in the movement of goods when they took over. They laid 
off the Indians who had been carrying the goods along the portage to Fort Schlosser and used carts instead. 
The Indians resented the loss of wages so they waylaid a wagon train returning to Lewiston from Fort 
Schlosser at what we now call Devil's Hole, attacked the soldiers and pushed the wagons off the cliff. Only 
the wagon master, John Stedman, and the drummer boy named Matthews escaped. In restitution, Sir 
William Johnson, Commissioner of Indian Affairs for the British Government, exacted from the Iroquois a 
reservation of four miles on both sides of the Niagara River for the British Government. 

When the Americans took over from the British after the Revolution, they reduced the reserved land 
to one mile. Many residents in North Tonawanda today see on their deeds "part of the Great Lot (x) of the 
Niagara River Reservation." Property west of Division Street is within that reserved area. Division Street 
was at one time named Mile Street because it is one mile east of the Niagara River. That is North 
Tonawanda's legacy from the Devil's Hole massacre. 



Because of all the fighting in the Western New York area families would not move here. There were 
some cabins used by fur traders but it was not until about 1809 that families started to come. George N. 
Burger was the earliest known settler, followed by Joshua Pettit in 1810. He settled on property near a 
stream which now runs through Fisherman's Park and is called Pettit's Creek Flume. Another early settler 
was Garret VanSlyke. He built a tavern on the north side of Tonawanda Creek in 1810. He had two 
daughters who operated a toll rope ferry across the creek. They once helped in the capture of a thief by 
stalling his escape across the creek. 

The War of 1812 encompassed the destruction of almost all buildings in this settlement called Niagara 
on both sides of Tonawanda Creek. But by 1817 settlers were beginning to come. The Erie Canal digging 
had commenced in Rome, New York. It promised great economic expansion along its length when it was 
completed. The community of Niagara could not fail to benefit. 

Stephen Jacobs, a veteran of the Battle of Bunker Hill, bought 196 acres of land along the Niagara 
River about two miles north of Tonawanda Creek in 1817. It was sold to him for $9 an acre by Judge 
Augustus Porter, a Buffalo resident whose family has had a significant influence on the growth of Western 
New York. James Carney settled on Tonawanda Island, sometimes called "Carney's Island", in 1819. In 
1825 the Island was sold at public auction but because of speculation the price rose above what Carney had 
provided and he lost it and moved to the mainland. 

Colonel John Sweeney and his brother, James, first settled in Buffalo in 1811. They bought much 
of the land north of Tonawanda Creek, later the Erie Canal, and had it cleared of lumber which was used 
to build a pier in Buffalo and to sell to settlers who purchased lots and needed the lumber to build their 
homes. The Sweeneys donated land for the first schoolhouse. Its location has a marker erected by the 
Historical Society of the Tonawandas on Main Street between Tremont and Goundry. They also gave the 
land for the Methodist Church which stands there. They were involved in the building of the first railroad 
depot and James' son John became the station agent. The Sweeney brothers had the first dock on 
Tonawanda Creek constructed and built the first grist mill and sawmill. They held several political offices. 
In 1825 James was given the right to operate a ferry from the north side of Tonawanda Creek to Grand 
Island. 



Dr. Jesse F. Locke was the first resident physician to locate his office in the Tonawandas. He started 
his practice in the village in 1838 and continued until his death in 1860. Henry P. Smith was a pioneer 
lumberman. He started rafting logs from the shores of Lake Erie to the Tonawandas. His descendant, Henry 
P. Smith III, was a congressman from this area for a number of years. 

In the meantime William Vandervoorte (the family later dropped the "e") had bought 1,700 acres of 
land from the Holland Land Company and built a home for himself. He sold lots to settlers including a large 
group from North Germany who had come to this country to escape religious persecution. They called their 
village Martinsville after the Lutheran leader Martin Luther. They settled along Sawyer's Creek and part of 
the Erie Canal. Their street was called William Street at one time, then Niagara Falls Boulevard. Sweeney 
Street joined it at Bush's Bridge which carried wagons and later cars from the brick road across the canal 
and on into Buffalo. Eventually Martinsville was annexed to North Tonawanda as was Gratwick. The street 
name was changed to Old Falls Boulevard when the curve in Niagara Falls Boulevard near the Wurlitzer 
plant was straightened out. The Boulevard now crosses the land where a sawmill stood which obtained its 
power from Sawyer's Creek. 

Another group of immigrants from Germany established itself firmly at the northern end of the area. 
Many of the men worked for White, Gratwick and Mitchell, a large lumber operation along the Niagara River 
near the present Riverside Chemical Company. Their community was called Gratwick. Mr. Gratwick was 
very wealthy. He owned two other companies, one of which controlled a 31,000 acre forest in northern 
Michigan. He lived in a turreted mansion on the northwest corner of Delaware Avenue and Summer Street 
in Buffalo. When Gratwick visited the mill, he must have had to come by carriage, train or trolley. He was 
connected to many civic activities. 



Men who were not employed in the lumbering industry found work in the band organ and wood 
carving business, or other employment connected with the great availability of lumber. Gratwick was a self- 
contained little village, as was Martinsville, with stores and other businesses along Oliver Street. Most of 
the families belonged to the Lutheran religion. They established St. Paul's Lutheran Church in 1888 on 
Washington Street and St. Mark Lutheran Church in 1891. St. Paul's has moved to East Felton Street and 
St. Mark's to Oliver Street. The building of the new St. Mark's took place while the Rev. Paul H. Fretthold 
was pastor there. His tenure was 42 years. He was prominent and nationally known among Lutherans as 
well as being respected and beloved among his congregation. 

William Vandervoort built the first hotel and managed a store on Grand Island when Stephen White 
began cutting the white oak there and sending it to Boston for shipbuilding. In 1836 a bank was established 
in the store. Vandervoort built the first brick residence for his sister, Sarah, on the north bank of the Erie 
Canal where the Packet Center now stands. White built a luxurious mansion in 1835 called "Beechwater" 
on Tonawanda Island near where Steamers Restaurant is now. Here he entertained Daniel Webster, the 
famous orator, U.S. Senator and statesman, as well as other prominent families. Webster was associated 
with White in business. Webster's son, Fletcher, married White's daughter. The island was the local 
center of lumbering activity and, unfortunately, the mansion was demolished in 1906 to make more room 
for the immense stacks of lumber. 

North Tonawanda's present Main Street was originally named Webster Street to honor Daniel 
Webster. Main Street had been the old Military Road joining Main Street on the south side according to a 
map of 1866. By 1575 Main Street became the road joining Delaware Street in Tonawanda to River Road 
in North Tonawanda. The principal business area became Webster Street. 

Development of the community of North Tonawanda was slow in the mid-eighteen hundreds but 
individuals began small enterprises such as general stores, grist mills, grain storage facilities, news 
publications, banks, and the like. Settlers moving west renewed their grocery stock, perhaps arranged for 
further water transportation, picked up supplies they would need in their new home or arranged for a letter 
to go back home to say how they were. 

A spur to development came with the advent of the railroads. They detracted from the business on 
the canal but commercial shipping was cheaper, though slower, by canal. Railroad tracks ran right down 
the center of Main Street in Tonawanda and Webster Street on the north side. At one time there were 
sixteen different railroad companies using the tracks in the Tonawandas and there were three streetcar lines. 

By the 1870's the lumber business was taking off. Logs from the shores of Lake Erie were running 
out, so rafting of logs fell off. Sawmills were being built further west so that ships could be loaded compactly 
with sawed lumber and shipped to the Tonawandas for transshipment by canal or rail. The Tonawandas 
Harbor was crowded with vessels waiting to be unloaded and then reloaded with machinery and other 
products needed further west. At one time the Tonawandas were the lumber capital of the world. Lumber 
was stacked from Isle View to Witmer Road with only a few breaks such as the Niagara Iron Works, later 
the Tonawanda Iron Works. Stacked lumber led to several disastrous fires among the lumber businesses 
in the two communities. Volunteer fire companies from the whole surrounding area would respond with their 
horse-drawn carts carrying their water tanks pumped by manpower. When firehouse horses died they were 
often honored like members of the brigade. 

Another important commodity shipped on the canal was grain. As the Midwest became populated, 
farmers shipped the grain from their rolling acres of golden wheat by water through the Great Lakes. North 
Tonawanda had a grain elevator owned by Louis T. Fick in 1882. There was a flour mill owned by McDonald 
& Ebersole and a feed mill owned by Franklin Getz in 1883. 



The Civil War was felt profoundly by North Tonawanda not only by its people but by their businesses. 
The most famous person was Lewis S. Payne. He was already an established businessman, husband and 
father. He raised a company of soldiers, outfitted them and was elected their captain. Payne became a 
scout for the Union Army. He was captured in 1862 while on duty and spent three years in a Confederate 
prison before being exchanged in March, 1865. He reached home on April 1, with the rank of Colonel, eight 
days before the assassination of President Lincoln. Col. Payne continued in business and politics after the 
war as before. He is buried in Elmlawn Cemetery. There is a blue and gold State marker on the central 
drive showing the direction to his grave. 

Many men of the area fought in the Civil War, not the least of whom was Fred Sommer. He was 
wounded at the Battle of Bull Run, discharged, and then volunteered as a guard at the prisoner-of-war camp 
in Elmira. A little known fact about the Civil War is that in North Tonawanda an iron-clad ship was being built 
for the Union Navy to take on the Confederate's Merrimac. It was named the "Tonawanda" but never saw 
duty because the war ended before it was commissioned. 

The use of natural gas for lighting streets and homes grew in the mid-to-late eighteen hundreds. 
Crude oil wells were discovered and research began on uses for it, leading to kerosene stoves and lamps, 
motor oil and a myriad of other uses. Manufacturing burgeoned in the late eighteen hundreds and early 20th 
Century. The Niagara River Iron Company was formed in 1872. Although it ran into financial trouble and 
closed, it reopened as the Tonawanda Iron Company. 

Four band organ companies were operating in North Tonawanda at one time. The one that lasted 
the longest was the Herschell-Spillman Company, one of whose buildings now houses the Carousel Museum. 

Eugene DeKleist owned the band organ company on Niagara Falls Boulevard near the trolley line 
to Lockport. He went into business with Rudolph Wurlitzer who bought him out and continued making 
musical instruments in the same building, renaming it Wurlitzer. Over the years, Rudolph and later his son, 
Farney, made the coin-operated record player, the electronic organ and piano and various devices to help 
in World Wars I and II. Farney's home still stands on the southwest corner of Goundry and Niagara Streets. 
Eugene DeKleist's modest factory still stands behind the larger Wurlitzer Industrial Complex on Niagara Falls 
Blvd. 



With the rapid growth of manufacturing came the influx of immigration. Some of the Irish who helped 
build the canal stayed on. Many Germans came in the first waves to escape conscription into the army, 
because of religious persecution, and to find work in band organ manufacturing and wood carving. They 
established Lutheran churches and schools. Hungarians came and also established a church. With the 
advent of large numbers of Polish and Italian families came the need for Roman Catholic churches to be 
added to those of the Methodists, Presbyterians, and Baptists. 

In the early years of settlement after the opening of the Erie Canal in 1825, Tonawanda and North 
Tonawanda were one community called Niagara. Then the large western county of Genesee was divided 
into Erie County and Niagara County with the dividing line at the canal. In 1854 the community became the 
Village of Tonawanda consisting of four wards. The First Ward was located on the north side of the canal 
(Tonawanda Creek) and the other three wards were south of the canal. 

In the 1850's petty differences arose between the First Ward and the other three over the gravel pit 
off Thompson Street near Payne Avenue in the First Ward. Gravel was taken and used for street purposes 
in all four wards. First Ward residents believed that taxes collected from their ward should be used to pay 
for work and gravel only on the streets of the First Ward. A resolution to that effect was brought before the 
Village Board of Trustees on May 6, 1854. However, the resolution was tabled, thus temporarily ending the 
dispute. ..but not for long! The Village continued to use First Ward gravel in the wards south of the canal (or 
creek) which further deteriorated the situation. 



The result was that, in 1855, the Village Board finally authorized the First Ward to withdraw from the 
Village of Tonawanda and in 1857 the State Legislature gave its approval. The two communities, however, 
still had many ties involving business, social, and family matters. The area north of the canal (the former 
First Ward) became part of the Township of Wheatfield for the following eight years and was governed by 
the Town Supervisors. By 1865 the community wanted to incorporate as a village. On May 8 the State 
Legislature approved and the weighty question of a name arose. "Niagara" was considered but there were 
already so many "Niagaras" that the "Village of North Tonawanda" was finally chosen. The Village continued 
to grow in population and expand in land area. Along with its sister village south of the canal, the two 
together became the largest lumber port in the world and an important manufacturing center. 

The Village Council Hall and Live Hose were located on Thompson Street between the railroad tracks 
and Oliver Street. The facility, built in 1874, also served as the first City Hall after North Tonawanda became 
a city. Municipal offices were located on the second floor. 

As the lumber business and other ventures grew coupled with the Village's rapid expansion and 
"growing pains" a movement arose to become a city, causing quite a bit of political wrangling. Lewis T. 
Payne, lawyer and son of Col. Lewis S. Payne, was opposed because he feared it would raise taxes. 
Nevertheless the State Legislature concurred and Henry E. Warner, a lawyer and assemblyman representing 
the village, introduced a bill to incorporate North Tonawanda as a city. On his second attempt, the bill was 
passed on April 24, 1897 and immediately signed by Governor Black. Assemblyman Warner telegraphed 
home with the good news that North Tonawanda was now a city. The sidewalks were made of wooden 
planks and the streets were gravel, but North Tonawanda was indeed a city. 

Our second City Hall was located at the corner of Main and Tremont Streets in a building that also 
housed the Police Department and the YMCA. 

In 1914 Europe became embroiled in World War I which lasted until 1918. The United States joined 
in 1917 after the sinking of the passenger ship "Lusitania." Many young men from the Tonawandas went 
off to war. Young women joined them as ambulance drivers and nurses. Men at home worked in factories 
to make products needed for war and women worked with the Red Cross, making bandages and knitting 
warm clothing for the "boys at the front." Some may remember the face of Uncle Sam on the poster with 
his finger pointing right at the viewer as he says, "Uncle Sam wants YOU! Buy War Bonds." Thirty-seven 
boys and men from North Tonawanda made the supreme sacrifice for their country in "The Great War." 

LeGrand Simson DeGraff, a prominent businessman, held a belief considered startling in his day, that 
a person enjoying material success owed a debt of gratitude to his community. On June 13, 1913, DeGraff, 
together with Army surgeon Dr. John A. Rafter and the Mayor, unveiled a plan to construct a community 
hospital in North Tonawanda. They rounded up support in the business community of the Tonawandas and 
DeGraff said that he and his associates were prepared to foot the entire bill for a brand new hospital building, 
fully equipped and ready to operate, at a cost not to exceed $40,000. There were two major conditions... that 
the indigent of the communities would receive free hospital care and the two cities were to maintain the 
hospital property. If they failed to meet these conditions for over two months, the property would revert to 
the doners for disposal. DeGraff lent his leadership, financial resources and ultimately his name to the 
hospital which would serve the Tonawandas. On November 30, 1914 DeGraff Memorial Hospital was 
unveiled to the public, and the first patient was admitted on December 4, 1914 at the cost of $1.30. 

Then, along came the flu epidemic of 1918. During the fall, every day brought its obituaries in the 
newspaper. DeGraff Hospital was unable to take all the cases of the "Spanish Flu" as it was called. The 
YMCA, located where Flanigan's Chevrolet is now, was pressed into service to accommodate cots in the 
gymnasium. Every able-bodied person helped. The Red Cross was very busy at home and abroad in those 
days. 



After the war women united to get the right to vote (granted in 1920) and prohibition was instituted 
which lasted about fourteen years (1919 - 1933). During that time there was quite a bit of "rum-running" 
between Canada and the United States across the Niagara River, Lake Erie and Lake Ontario. The Jazz 
Era, the Roaring Twenties, had begun with bobbed hair, short skirts, dances like the Charleston and the 
Black Bottom. There were several dance halls in and around the city. Young men would take their dates 
there or maybe they would go to a movie, stopping afterwards at the Sugar Bowl for a soda or sundae. A 
fellow might even get a goodnight kiss at the door if he played his cards right. 

Although there was an economic slump after the war, employment improved. New industries and 
businesses were springing up. Durez was founded it 1921. The Tonawanda Iron Works was going well. 
The Niagara Savings and Loan was thriving. Remington Rand, Cramer Industrial Supplies, the Auto Wheel 
Coaster Company, Lenox Furniture, International Paper Company and numerous lumber companies were 
functioning. Van Raalte Silk Mill, where the Packet Center is now, was making silk stockings. The Rivera 
Theater was opened in 1926 with silent movies in black and white to the tunes of the "Mighty Wurlitzer" 
organ. 



In 1929 the cornerstone was laid for a new City Hall building. It was constructed on Payne Avenue 
by Thompson Street on one side and the property known as Brauer Park on the other. Dedicated in 1930, 
the cost was $200,000. City Hall now occupies the site of the infamous "gravel pit" that led to the separation 
of the Village of Tonawanda into two areas, one north of the canal and the other south of the canal, that 
eventually became the Cities of North Tonawanda and Tonawanda. 

And then came the crash of 1929! Businesses closed, factories laid off workers, people were forced 
to use whatever they had been able to save to live on. They tried to get credit at the grocery store and come 
to an arrangement with the landlord about the rent. There was no safety net of welfare or unemployment 
insurance. Private social services were overwhelmed with applications for assistance. 

Some families tried to grow a few vegetables in their yards. If the law allowed, they might keep a 
few chickens for eggs and meat. In early spring dandelion greens with bacon grease and vinegar dressing 
substituted for lettuce. Wild strawberries and other berries supplemented the diet. Those who had access 
to a creek and were experienced might be able to catch enough frogs for a frog-leg meal, or a snapping 
turtle for turtle soup. Some householders knew edible mushrooms well enough to feel safe in gathering them 
after a rainy spell. Many housewives knew how to cook animal heart, liver, kidneys, brains and stomachs 
(sweetbreads) to supply protein. For after-school snacks, children often had a cup of milk-soaked bread or 
a piece of bread and butter with a forbidden sprinkle of brown sugar. 

Few "Help Wanted" ads were running. Gradually the government provided some programs which 
helped. Companies which had closed or slowed down were encouraged to begin producing again under the 
National Recovery Act. A group of young men whose families were on relief (welfare) had just joined the 
Civilian Conservation Corps and older men were offered the Works Progress Administration. These two 
groups performed public works projects. The 1937 North Tonawandan read repeatedly that, "the rearmed 
nations of Europe were ready for another war." 

Sixty years ago North Tonawanda was a busy town. The Tonawandas City Directory for 1937 
exhorted, "The Twin Cities are rapidly losing their separate identity. While not yet united politically, they are 
so united in spirit, and in civic and patriotic endeavor, that they have come to be known everywhere as The 
Tonawandas’." The Twin Cities' population was estimated at 33,503. Labor and jobs were vitally important 
to the Depression community. About 10,000 men. ..no mention of women... were employed in local industries. 



Some of those companies were: Buffalo Bolt Co., Rudolph Wurlitzer Manufacturing Co., Remington 
Rand, Inc. (early information retrievers), American District Steam Co., International Paper Co., Van Raalte 
Co. (fabric producers), Buffalo Steel Co., Creo-Dipt (manufacturers of shingles), Auto Wheel Coaster Co. 
(producers of children's wagons and sleds), Spillman Engineering Corp. (amusement rides). ..all moved, 
merged or gone today. 

Still here in 1997 are William Wattengel Funeral Home, Riverside Chemical, Inc., in business since 
1906, Wagenschuetz Hardware Co. and Buffalo Pumps. In 1937 Berry Electric Co. advertised home service 
for electric appliances. Walker Brothers and Monroe sold and repaired timepieces at 50 Webster Street. 
Insurance coverage could be obtained from Crown Insurance, which might cover repairs to your car at 
Kudla's Collision Service. The present Chesapeake Packaging was then Tonawanda Corrugated Box 
Company. 

The Tonawandas still were a large white pine lumber market because of the Great Lakes, the Barge 
Canal and railroads which facilitated transport. Among the goods produced by the still plentiful lumber yards 
were millwork, trim, wall boards, and shingles. Bennett Homes, many of which were built on Stanley and 
Bennett Streets and near present day Lowry Middle School, were produced by Bennett Lumber Company 
and advertised nationally. 

The Lowry Middle School building was formerly the city's high school with George Lowry as principal. 
He retained that post for 30 years. Legendary football coach George Vetter had just been appointed. Felton 
Grammar School, a large Victorian edifice constructed in 1901 at Bryant and Thompson Streets, served 
younger scholars. It was named for active citizen and past Board of Education President Benjamin Felton 
and had been the high school from its opening until 1926. Seven elementary, two Roman Catholic, and four 
Lutheran schools educated primary students. 

In June, 1937 someone with a spare $.50 could escape the heat and the Depression with a sail on 
the show boat Canadiana for a three hour ride on Lake Erie. Dancing to an orchestra and a cooling lake 
ride were part of the tab. Twenty-eight couples took out marriage licenses, almost double 1936's totals. A 
six-room house on East Felton Street was advertised for $3,200. If you were one of 958 citizens working 
a 40-hour week at Remington Rand making Aristocrat and Kardex files, you could save your money at the 
State and First Trust Banks and get a mortgage and a $113 Frigidaire for your new kitchen. If a worker 
lacked a private car, public transport could carry the family to Niagara Falls, Buffalo, or Lockport on trolley 
cars, but their days were numbered even before World War II. On August 20, 1937, mounting labor unrest 
contributed to the demise of the International Railway Company. Their tracks remained for years. 
Carpenter's Rapid Transit provided local bus service, and the Erie, New York Central, and Lehigh Valley 
railroads carried passengers and freight. 

Gratwick, the First Ward, Oliver Street, and the streets west of Division existed in 1937 as they do 
today. But there were many blank spaces on the 1937 map. Wurlitzer Park, the properties along Sweeney 
Street (except for Martinsville) and north of Walck Road, and the area behind Ward Road were sparsely 
inhabited. Homeowners could see the railroad tracks clearly from Ward Road. 

The Evening News had just been bought by Charles E. Hewitt. Social Security legislation had 
recently been held constitutional by the Supreme Court. Amelia Earhart's plane was lost. Actress Jean 
Harlow succumbed to kidney disease. "Okies" left their dust bowl homes for the far west. Murder and 
scandal were perennially popular news stories. 

Remington Rand was founded by James Rand, Jr., a Goundry Street resident who borrowed $10,000 
from his father, who ran an office supply company, to start a business whose product was visible file 
systems. Later the two Rands merged, and further mergers created an internationally known enterprise. 



Recovery from the Depression was slow but it was given a help up when the Allies went to war with 
Hitler in 1939. They were desperately in need of war material which the United States finally agreed to 
provide under the Lend-Lease Act. This put many men back to work. Soon the United States began to 
mobilize and federalize the National Guard. After Pearl Harbor, many more women began taking factory jobs 
to replace those of men who went to war. 

Throughout 1940 news of weddings and summer picnics was interspersed with accounts of the Battle 
of Britain. Young men were urged to enlist immediately for choice assignments. Of concern to immigrant 
North Tonawandans was the registration and fingerprinting of aliens. The draft was approved on October 
16 for all men between 21 and 35, and high school bandmaster Stanley Cyran left for Fort Dix. 

"Uncle Sam needs all your old newspapers and magazines for packing!,", urged the Evening News 
of Oct. 29, 1941. Boy Scouts were assigned to pick them up. It was the forerunner of our modern day 
recycling. Scrap collection drives were begun to gather metals for the factories. Homemakers took the tops 
and bottoms out of used cans, flattened them and added them to anything else they could find. One of North 
Tonawanda's major donations was the engine in the house high up in the cantilever bridge which was only 
used once or twice to raise the bridge to make sure it worked. Then the project of building bridges all along 
the Erie Canal for ocean-going vessels was abandoned because of the high cost. 

Before rationing was instituted later, Budwey’s at 425 Oliver Street sold ten lbs. of sugar for $.47. 
Wilders Hardware Store offered two now obsolete household necessities for $1 each... ash cans and wash 
boilers. Coal would be delivered by Ives Ice & Coal, Rose Coal & Builders Supplies or Thiele Coal and 
Feed. A Mercury coach automobile cost $629. The silhouette of a B24 bomber was a teaching tool for 
identifying Allied or enemy aircraft. Ann Sheridan, Jack Oakie, and Martha Raye starred in "Navy Blues" at 
the Riviera Theatre. Oliver Street residents could patronize the Avondale Theatre at Robinson Street. 
Fighting Ships of the USA had just arrived at the Library. 

News of enlistees filled the paper. An article contained suggestions of what to take with you when 
you reported for induction. With 28% less nicotine, a gift of Camels was just the right present for your soldier 
boy. "So many men and boys have jobs in defense industries that help is scarce," and 50 women registered 
for defense work. 

Pearl Harbor, on the island of Oahu in Hawaii, is best known as the scene of the Japanese bombing 
of the U S. Pacific Fleet on December 7, 1941. Most of the fleet was in the harbor when Japanese carrier- 
based planes attacked without warning. Nineteen U.S. ships were damaged or sunk; on the ground at 
Wheeler Field 188 planes were destroyed. The raid caused over 2,200 casualties with negligible losses to 
the Japanese. The attack brought the U.S. into World War II. Newspaper headlines and radios screamed, 
"Congress Declares War on Japan" and in another week, "U.S. Now at War with Nazis." 

After Pearl Harbor in 1941 rationing of food and shoes was instituted to make sure that there would 
be enough food and leather products for our armed forces and those of our allies. Gasoline and heating oil 
were rationed. Metal supplies for domestic use were scarce. So that there would be no profiteering resulting 
from shortages, the government put a ceiling on prices, wages, and rent. When women went to work, child 
care centers were opened to care for the children. Housing was hastily built to give homes to families 
moving here to work in factories doing war work such as Bell Aircraft, Buffalo Bolt and the Tonawanda Iron 
Works. Water and sewage plants were guarded against sabotage. Defense wardens were recruited. Durez 
produced phenol-formaldehyde plastic for the detonator caps of shells. The repercussions of this appeared 
decades later on the home front. Uncle Sam selected Richardson Boat Company to build 20 picket boats. 
Later on Richardson Boat produced 60 LCVP (landing craft vehicle, personnel) vessels each month, winning 
an Army-Navy "E" for outstanding production. Among other firms so honored were Buffalo. Pumps and 
Wurlitzer, now defense contractors. 



Wurlitzer's 1944 ad boasted, "The world over Wurlitzer goes on duty when men go on leave. In 
canteens and USO centers... back of almost every fighting front fighting men enjoy Wurlitzer recorded music." 
The firm was engaged in secret "research in the field of sound reproduction." The Wurlitzer factory on 
Niagara Falls Blvd. was a lovingly landscaped showplace, famed for its colorful flower gardens. Gardening 
was an interest of the plant's chief, Farney Wurlitzer. When he came to North Tonawanda in 1909, he 
managed a small factory, producing player pianos. They made band organs to accompany Herschell 
carousels and " Mighty Wurlitzer" electric pipe organs to accompany silent movies. With the advent of 
"talkies," Wurlitzer switched to the nickelodeon and later jukeboxes and pianos. Mr. Wurlitzer's home at 373 
Goundry Street later became the Town Club and, in 1993 after that group disbanded, reverted to private 
ownership. 

The last city directory published for the duration of the war appeared in 1942. There were 2/3 of a 
page of confectioners, six hotels including the WaHaKie Hotel on River Road, and 15 lumber dealers. The 
public elementary schools were Goundry, Pine Woods, Gratwick, Col. Payne, Wurlitzer, and Gilmore. All 
but Gilmore have been either demolished or converted to other uses. As part of the campaign to conserve 
for defense needs, the home of Frank Markowitz at 302 Niagara Street was reshingled with Creo-Dipt Zephyr 
shingles as "old homes must be made to serve anew." "Sweeney Park" is now Pine Woods Park and at the 
bend of Payne and 21st Avenues was "Polonia Park." The Hotel Shelton had been demolished in 1941. 
Ground was broken for the Nor-Ton Courts housing project on Spruce Street. 

"Help Wanted" ads proliferated. Women could do "light, clean factory work" at Wurlitzer or 
International Paper. Because their sisters were at the front or in defense industries, DeGraff Hospital 
complained of a shortage of nurses' aides. Women were needed to read meters and watch for enemy 
aircraft. You could purchase war damage insurance to cover your losses if the enemy did attack. A full page 
and more of service-related items filled each Evening News. Wartime brides no longer wore silk wedding 
gowns but rather suits, and their new husbands, uniforms. "Henry Aldrich's Little Secret" and "The Invisible 
Man's Revenge" played at the Avondale. When soldiers came marching home, they found that $5,550 could 
buy a house at 25 Allen Street. North Tonawanda lost a total of 103 brave men to World War II, which finally 
ended in 1945 after the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and Japan surrendered. 

There was a period of adjustment after the war when armaments were no longer needed but there 
was such a great need for civilian goods that factories changed rapidly and employment was high. In fact 
so many men and women were working and making good wages now that the specter of inflation appeared 
and grew. Ceilings had been taken off wages and rents, food and shoes were no longer rationed and the 
country prospered. At first the city did not change much, but by 1948 there were many empty stores on 
Manhattan Street. Four buildings stood alone in the 700 block of Meadow Drive, east of Nash Road, by 
1951. A great spurt in home construction opened Meadow Drive through from Payne Avenue, and Jesella, 
Pioneer, Moll and Master streets all opened by 1955. Abington Place and Belmont Court were platted in 
1960. North Tonawanda as we know it was emerging. 

The Korean War (1950-1953) was a conflict between forces of the United Nations (primarily the U.S. 
and South Korea) on one side and forces of North Korea and later communist China on the other. Korea 
had been divided along latitude 38 degrees north in 1945, Russia becoming the occupying force north of this 
line, and the U.S south of it. The war began when, having attempted to topple the government of the South 
by indirect means, North Korea launched a surprise invasion. United Nation forces were sent to assist South 
Korea under General Douglas MacArthur. The complexion of the war changed several times and the fighting 
moved back and forth over the 38th parallel. MacArthur was replaced in April 1951 by General Ridgway. 
Two years of negotiations, begun in July, achieved only an armistice signed on July 27, 1953. A peace 
treaty has never been signed and Korea remains divided as before. Thirteen lives from North Tonawanda 
were lost in the Korean Conflict. 



Then came the "Cold War" (post-World War II relations between the Western Powers led by the U.S. 
and the communist bloc led by the USSR). Famous incidents in the Cold War included the Berlin Airlift 
(1948-49) and the Cuban Missile Crisis (1962). By seeking de'tente and by negotiating arms-limitation 
treaties, the U.S. and USSR sought to relax Cold War tensions. 

The War in Vietnam began as a conflict in South Vietnam between South Vietnamese government 
forces backed by the U.S. and communist guerrilla insurgents, the Vietcong, backed by North Vietnam. The 
conflict originated in 1941 when a Vietminh guerrilla force was formed under Ho Chi Minh to fight the 
Japanese. In 1965 the U.S. had begun bombing the North in retaliation for the Use of Northern troops in 
the South. Increasing numbers of U.S. combat troops began to arrive and totaled nearly 550,000 by 1968. 
The large-scale U.S. campaign proved unable to do more than hold back the highly motivated Vietcong. 
Vietnamese civilians suffered terribly at the hands of both sides. Fruitless peace talks began in Paris in 1968 
and in 1969 President Nixon announced the "Vietnamization" of the war by building up South Vietnam forces 
and withdrawing U.S. combat troops. The war had spread to Cambodia and Laos before a "ceasefire" signed 
in January 1973 preceded the total withdrawal of U.S. troops a few months later. The South was then 
overrun by Vietcong and North Vietnamese forces and the war effectively ended with the fall of Saigon in 
May 1975. North Tonawanda lost 12 casualties to this most unpopular war. 

Citizens numbered 24,750 in 1951. Principal industries were: amusement devices, bolts and nuts, 
box boards, chemicals, grinding wheels, pleasure cruisers, office equipment and supplies, musical 
instruments, print paper, rayon goods, children's wagons and sleds, steam heating equipment, steam pumps, 
pig iron, and lumber and lumber products. In 1955 Melody Fair, a theatre-in-the-round, opened in a large 
tent at its present site under the direction of impresario, Lew Fisher. He brought a taste of the Broadway 
stage to North Tonawanda. Its permanent structure was built in 1974. In later years Melody Fair has 
featured a broad spectrum of musical entertainment. As postwar development intensified, northern 
neighborhoods sprouted streets of homes and thousands of children. The estimated school age population 
in 1952 was 4,275, with 1,100 in high school, 650 at Felton Grammar, and 2,575 in elementary schools. 
Gilmore School was expanded in 1957. Drake School was erected during the late 1950's. The city was 
acquiring property for the new high school and Spruce Elementary School. Ending years of overcrowding 
and double sessions, the high school opened in 1962 as did Ohio Elementary School. Named in honor of 
the late physician and Board of Education member, Dr. Thaddeus F. Reszel Junior High School opened in 
1968 to serve north side students. Felton Grammar School, no longer needed, was demolished the next 
year. Luther Manor senior citizens apartment complex occupies its former site. The Catholic Diocese 
operated Bishop Gibbons High School at 1110 Payne Avenue from 1961 to 1971. Run by the Barnabite 
Fathers and Felician Sisters, after it closed it became Bishop Gibbons Apartments for senior citizens. Other 
such complexes are Scarfone Apartments, named for Stephen A. Scarfone, manager of the housing projects 
on Spruce Street, which it adjoins, and Carousel Park, a high rise at Goundry and Oliver Streets at the 
former site of Allan Herschell operations. 

The 1960's were a time of road building. East Robinson Street was extended through to Division 
Street only in 1967. The impetus for joining Robinson and East Robinson Streets was to provide access to 
Powerline Plaza at Division and Erie. Also in 1967 the "Division Street Arterial" was approved. It generally 
followed the old high speed trolley line route. Say, did you know that North Tonawanda had its own "yellow 
brick road?" In recent years while Payne Avenue was being repaved, the yellow bricks with which it was at 
one time paved were revealed along the edges. Moving from 81-83 Webster Street, the Tonawanda News, 
under the direction of Mrs. Charles E. Hewitt, Jr., took up new, larger quarters on River Road in 1960. As 
population surged to northern neighborhoods, shopping and services followed. Payne Avenue Plaza, now 
Mid-City, opened with ten stores in 1951. The Sample, W.T. Grant Co., and a Your Host Restaurant joined 
Niagara Savings and Loan, Marine Trust Co., and Allan Mack Pharmacy there ten years later. Over the 
years, a variety of stores have come, gone and been replaced, by others. The new pla?as had the 
regrettable effect of draining customers from older establishments along Oliver Street, forcing long time small 
businesses such as Niese's Dry Goods to close. 



Shoppers lined up across the parking lot of the new Tops Supermarket on Goundry Street on opening 
day in 1964. Not that there were not many other supermarkets in town... there were... but by 1997 only two 
remain within the city limits. The old hotels fell into disrepair and were demolished. The Van Raalte 
Company site was taken over by the Downtowner, later the Packet Inn, in 1966. After some changes in 
ownership, it has become the Packet Center and now houses 84 efficiency apartments, a restaurant and 
offices. A local institution, the Sugar Bowl, quietly closed in 1965 when the Pullman brothers decided they 
no longer wished to continue the confectionery/ice cream parlor at 32 Webster Street. 

Industrial musical chairs was the 1960's game. Taber Instrument moved to the old Bell Avionics Plant 
and Bell moved to Wheatfield. Roblin Steel added a third shift. Durez and Lawless Container added more 
space. So did Niagara Cutter. Mirrorlite Plastics made plastic cigar tips in the old Victor Safe Building on 
Payne Avenue. International Paper Co. marked its 40th year in 1964; ten years later they moved to New 
England. Taylor Devices advertised "liquid shocks." It still exists on Tonawanda Island. 

Even in those expanding times, the sad line of closed, merged, or moved business had begun -- 
Buffalo Bolt, Van Raalte, Victor Safe, Herschell Company, Richardson Boat. Although the 500,000th Wurlitzer 
jukebox appeared in 1962, the last one was manufactured at the local plant in 1974. The city was becoming 
less of a factory town and more of a bedroom community for the Niagara Frontier. No longer was it 
necessary to expand schools. Fewer babies and a shortage of trained maternity nurses forced DeGraff 
Hospital to close its obstetrical services. A planned merger with Buffalo General Hospital was announced 
in 1996. 

The industrial heritage of wartime and post-war North Tonawanda left an unhappy, dangerous legacy 
of inactive hazardous waste dumps. In wake of the nearby Love Canal situation in Niagara Falls, the 1980's 
brought awareness of possible dioxin-contaminated ground water in the vicinity of Occidental Chemical 
Corporation's Durez factory. The company also had used Gratwick-Riverside Park as a chemical dump. 
For ten years cleanup was undertaken on these and the former Booth Oil property on Robinson Street and 
Schreck's Scrapyard on Schenck Street. These and a few smaller sites were discovered, realized as 
possible contaminants, and ultimately cleaned up. 

North Tonawanda is still a viable community. Looking back and forward, much remains to be 
cherished. 

The Carnegie Library, built in the center of town in 1904 at 240 Goundry Street with a $20,000 gift 
from philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, was headed by H. Pauline VanVoorhees Bentley from 1922-1962. 
Chartered in 1893, it was already in its second home, the first being now-demolished Goundry School, which 
preceded Felton Grammar as the city's first high school. Overcrowding impelled the construction of the 
"downstairs" children's room in 1938. Supplying children with books in their schools was a priority with Mrs. 
Bentley. The library joined the Nioga Library System in 1965. A 25,000 sq. ft. building on Meadow Drive 
replaced the jam-packed Carnegie Library on July 4, 1975. It has since expanded. By 1997 computerization 
has affected every aspect of the library now housing 142,000 books, as well as videos, audio cassettes, and 
other materials, in addition to active reference and children's departments. Literacy Volunteers of North 
Tonawanda, a volunteer tutoring service, was established at the library in 1981. 

The Carnegie Art Center has occupied the library's former home since 1976. Operated by the 
Tonawandas' Council on the Arts, it is a moderately sized nonprofit art gallery and concert venue as well as 
an art school. All gallery spaces retain the original yellow pine flooring cut at local lumber mills in the City 
of North Tonawanda. In a park-like setting surrounded by gracious homes, the Carnegie has long been a 
cultural center for the Niagara Frontier community, dedicated to bringing a variety of cultural events to the 
Tonawandas and Western New York. 



A group of carousel enthusiasts banded together in 1979 to form the Carousel Society of the Niagara 
Frontier. Dedicated to preserving the history of the merry-go-round in a city famed for them, they acquired 
a 1916 Allan Herschell carousel and began restoring it in 1982. The Herschell Factory complex, where 
wooden carousels were made, was purchased by the Society in 1985. Volunteers spent countless hours 
renovating a decrepit building complex. Now it functions as a museum where visitors can see wooden 
horses being carved by skilled craftsmen. In addition to horses, other animals have adorned carousels. The 
"hop toad", designed and carved in North Tonawanda, is the only carousel animal with human clothes. 
Children of all ages can ride the historical carousel and enjoy concerts and programs. The Carrousel Factory 
Museum is one of only two remaining carousel factories in the country, and the only complex which houses 
a museum. More than 23,000 people visited the museum in 1996. 

On Dec. 30, 1926, the "showplace of the Tonawandas," the new Rivera Theatre opened on Webster 
Street. Designed in the Italian Renaissance style, the theatre, later renamed Riviera, was decorated with 
stained glass windows, elaborate tile floors, paintings, and murals. The highlight was the Wurlitzer organ, 
a demonstrator installed by the manufacturer across town. Seating 1,200, the theatre was a motion picture 
house from the day it opened, showing silent movies accompanied by Wurlitzer organ music. As television 
replaced movies, the Riviera fell onto neglect. (The Avondale no longer exists as a theater.) Monthly organ 
concerts were the only attraction that kept the theatre going. In 1989 the Niagara Frontier Theater Organ 
Society purchased the theatre and its contents. Since then volunteers have worked to restore the interior 
and its "Mighty Wurlitzer" organ. 

The Riviera is now listed on the registries of the State and National Historical Landmarks along with 
the Carrousel Museum and the Carnegie Art Center. 

The museum of the Historical Society of the Tonawandas is located in the old New York Central and 
Hudson River Railroad Station at 113 Main Street in the City of Tonawanda. The building was erected in 
1870 and used as a rail station until 1922. Made of red brick, ornate wooden scroll work under the eaves 
of both ends consists of carvings of squirrels along with upright poles which support wood carvings of a man 
playing a flute. Throughout the years, the building was occupied by Post #264 of the American Legion, the 
Boy Scouts and the Delaware Street School. From 1935 it was used to house the library until 1964. The 
station was turned over to the Historical Society by the City of Tonawanda. The museum houses and 
preserves artifacts and other materials related to the rich historical heritage of the Tonawandas. Eight cast 
iron and aluminum markers have been erected by the Society throughout the "twin cities" designating historic 
sites. Willard B. Dittmar is the Executive Director and also serves as Historian for the City of Tonawanda. 
Elizabeth Robson serves in the same capacity for the City of North Tonawanda. If you ever have the 
opportunity to spend some time with these two "guardians" of our history, they will regale you with "tales of 
the Tonawandas." Their knowledge is priceless! 

Come to Robinson Street and Payne Avenue, behind the church, at 7 a.m. on a Saturday in August. 
It's harvest time, and the North Tonawanda Public Market, known as the Farmers' Market, is the place to buy 
fresh produce, cheese, baked goods, preserves, plants, and to see and be seen. Everyone goes to market. 
In business since August 23, 1908, the popular attraction is open all year round. Fresh farm produce vies 
with "locally grown bananas" sold by hucksters. A trip there is a lot of fun, a place to meet old friends and 
a healthy way to spend more money than you planned. 

No longer a highway for mules and barges, the Erie Barge Canal, renamed the New York State Barge 
Canal, now serves as a pleasure boater's path across the state. The walls of lumber are gone and the docks 
hold sailboats and outboarders. The Twin Cities of Tonawanda and North Tonawanda celebrate their 
common waterfront heritage during Canal Fest, a week long event held each July. Initiated by the Chamber 
of Commerce of the Tonawandas in 1983, it is now run by Canal Fest Inc. It was designed, to bring the 
Tonawandas together, providing visitors with a history of the canal and community in addition to family- 
oriented fun. 



A huge craft show and flea market attract thousands of visitors and hundreds of vendors. The Canal 
Fest Parade features floats and marching units from Twin Cities' organizations. A waterborne version on 
the canal is the Antique Boat Parade. All historic sites are open. Traditional Twin Cities rivalry continues 
in the annual tug of war. The Mayor of the losing city must push his or her counterpart across the 
Renaissance Bridge in a wheel barrow. Additional events include the Canal Fest Queen Event, a water- 
skiing show along the canal, a four-mile run, canal boat tours, an antique and classic car show and 
amusement rides. Also, an old-fashioned bed race, greased pole and fishing contests, the Twin Cities 
Officials softball game, concerts, street dances, all sorts of food and drink and much more, with a fireworks 
display on closing night. There's something for everyone at Canal Fest! 

Cross-canal sports rivalries continue. The annual "T-NT" football game is a schoolboy grid classic. 
The North Tonawanda Lumberjacks won the first contest in 1904 without lights or mechanical scoreboard, 
defeating the Tonawanda Red Warriors 18-6. Neither Depressions nor wars nor arctic cold have stopped 
the game. The late George Vetter coached Lumberjack teams for 34 years, retiring with a record of 194 
wins, 42 losses, and 13 ties. Coach Vetter was proud that the stadium behind Lowry Middle School was 
named in his honor in 1971. New high school athletic fields opened in 1996, and the grandstand at 
venerable Vetter Field was demolished this year. Tonawanda won an overtime thriller, 7-6, in 1996. The 
all-time T-NT winning record? Lumberjacks 49, Warriors 29 and 9 ties as of our Centennial Birthday. 

Coincident with the city's centennial, more than 15 churches marked their 100th anniversaries during 
the 1980's and 90's. First United Methodist and two Lutheran churches, St. Martin and St. Paul, both in 
Martinsville, exceeded the 150 year mark. St. Mark's Episcopal Church celebrated its 125th anniversary in 
1994. The extraordinary number of Lutheran churches attests to the German immigrants from 1840 and 
beyond. Many of them conducted services in German for years. One well-known pastor was the Rev. Paul 
H. Fretthold (mentioned earlier), the spiritual leader at St. Mark Lutheran Church in Gratwick from 1916-1958. 
It is said that he angrily preached one Sunday morning that he had driven up Oliver Street, counting saloons. 
"One on every corner," he thundered, and "No wonder people don't get to church Sunday morning!" Pastor 
Fretthold's descendants run Fretthold's Funeral Home on Oliver Street. 

Mr. and Mrs. Terry Rank and son Justin wrote to the Tonawanda News to thank the officers who, at 
the height of the Blizzard of 1977, carried Mrs. Rank into the hospital where Justin was born three minutes 
later. The storm struck before noon on Jan. 30th, blinding drivers with 60 mph winds, 15 degree 
temperatures, and zero visibility. Cars were abandoned. Workers were stranded in offices and factories, 
some for days. Police, snowmobilers, and firefighters worked steadily to ferry essential workers to their jobs 
and deliver supplies to the snowbound. The Tonawanda News and DeGraff Hospital never closed, and city 
streets were passable two days after the storm ended. 

Henry P. Smith III, was a descendant of two old-time local families. He represented North 
Tonawanda in Congress from 1964 to 1975 after serving as mayor, and later as judge of Niagara County 
Surrogate's Court and Family Court. Representative Smith was known for his opposition to impeaching 
Richard Nixon during the Watergate scandal. 

Women had served on the Board of Education since Colletta Smith's tenure in the 1920's and 30's. 
But, in 1977, Elizabeth C. Hoffman was the first woman to be elected to the Common Council. "Betty," as 
she was popularly known, was also the city's first female mayor and holds the distinction of having been 
elected to seven consecutive terms, serving from 1980 to 1992, when she won a seat in the New York State 
Assembly. Barbara Banfield succeeded Mrs. Hoffman as First Ward representative, and a strong female 
presence now exists on the Common Council. 



Goundry Street resident George Maziarz, whose family was active in local politics for many years, 
began his political career as Deputy City Clerk in 1977, becoming City Clerk the next year. He was elected 
County Clerk in 1989 until, in a special election, he was chosen to complete the term of State Senator John 
Daly, who resigned in 1995 to accept the governor's appointment to the Department of Transportation. 
Senator Maziarz represents the 61st District in Albany, having won election to a full term in 1996. 

According to the official 1990 Census, North Tonawanda's population is 34,989. In 1996, there were 
30,200 telephones in service, compared with 5,000 in 1940. Operators were replaced by dial phones in 
1950. The chief industries employ 9,650 people, manufacturing box board, chemicals, precision instruments, 
liquid springs, steam pumps, paint, and metal and machine work. Many small companies have moved into 
buildings formerly occupied by departed firms. Wurlitzer Industrial Park, National Industrial Park and St. Mary 
Industrial Center all act as "incubators" for young, growing businesses. The North Tonawanda Centre of 
Commerce located on Wurlitzer Drive, off Erie Avenue, serves as an attractive location for Twin City Glass, 
AccuDie, ASOMA Instruments/Twin City, Inc. (pioneers in thickness measurement technology), FEI Products 
and Glidden Machine and Tool. Nearby Blue Bird Coach Lines provides transportation and bus tours. 
DeGraff Memorial Hospital is the city's largest employer. Schools are located predominately in north side 
neighborhoods. ..Drake, Gilmore, Meadow and Ohio. Meadow Elementary and the high school share a new 
science wing constructed in 1994 and a gymnasium/auditorium dedicated in 1995. Grant and Spruce serve 
the south side of the city, and there are Catholic, Lutheran and Baptist parochial schools. The Canadiana 
does not provide service anymore but the Niagara Clipper docks on River Road and offers lunch and dinner 
cruises and sightseeing opportunities. Tonawanda Island boasts two large marinas for pleasure vessels to 
dock and there is additional dockage along the river. 

Increasingly the economy of the world has become global. Much manufacturing has left North 
Tonawanda for lower taxes, newly built factories, subsidized businesses, and cheaper labor. The economy 
of this city is becoming geared more to smaller business enterprises. 

We are, however, discovering our rich historical heritage and its possibilities for tourism. New York 
State is recognizing this with financial assistance. North Tonawanda is awakening to the recreational, 
historical, and economic advantages of its four seasons along with our water heritage. ..the New York State 
(Erie) Canal and the great Niagara River. 

Another millennium.... another century will bring exciting changes and challenges to the City of North 
Tonawanda. 





Webster Street, c. 1928 

Looking south on Webster Street from the corner of Goundry Street, the original 
oblong-shaped marquee of the Rivera Theatre is visible on the left. The Rivera had 
opened on December 30, 1926, just a short time before this photograph was taken. 
Goundry and Webster Streets were paved with bricks. 



The Smith Building, located at the corner of Webster and Tremont Streets, was 
originally known as the Real Estate Exchange Building. Constructed in the 1 8 9 0 ' s , it was 
called North Tonawanda's skyscraper. The Smith Building also contained apartments 
called "Davenport Flats." The original Rivera Theatre, renamed the "Riviera" by Shea's 
Management Company, had a new marquee. An office building now occupies the former 
Smith Building site. 



Smith Building, c. 1930 






Riviera Theatre, c. 1930 

The Rivera Theatre, 67 Webster Street, was billed as the "Showplace of the 
Tonawandas" when the doors opened on Thursday, December 30, 1926. Advance 
reservations for the night cost $1.00. The theatre was built by the Yellen Family, and 
Lempart and Son, Architects, developed the design, which was patterned after the 
opulent Renaissance style. The Wurlitzer organ for the new theatre was shipped from the 
Wurlitzer Company on November 26, 1926 and remains there today. 

When Michael Shea's company took over management of the theatre in 1930, the 
name was changed to the Riviera and a new marquee was installed. The Niagara Frontier 
Theatre Organ Society acquired the theatre on February 14, 1989 and has worked with 
the community to restore the Riviera to its original grandeur. 




The "Mighty Wurlitzer" at the Riviera Theatre, c. 1995 



The organ installed at the Rivera Theatre was shipped from the Wurlitzer Company 
on November 26, 1926. The console was painted to harmonize with the theatre's interior 
by a Wurlitzer band organ artist. 






Goundry School, c. 1910 



Goundry School was constructed in 1866 and was the first major school building 
in the Village of North Tonawanda. The principal and four teachers provided instruction 
to students. The school, located next to the former Andrew Carnegie Library, was 
demolished when the new school administration facility on Humphrey Street was 
constructed. 




Andrew Carnegie Library, c. 1995 

The Carnegie Library was constructed at 240 Goundry Street in 1904 with resources 
from the wealthy industrialist, Andrew Carnegie. The former library, owned by the City, 
has a beautiful rotunda and two side galleries. It now houses the Carnegie Art Center. 



L 






MEMORIES OF FELTON GRAMMAR-HIGH SCHOOL - 1926-27 



These memories are recollected by a student from Martinsville, coming from a class of six or seven 
girls who finished sixth grade, and went to the "big" school in the City of North Tonawanda, Felton Grammar. 
It has been a LONG time, with some memories fading and others very sharp. Our small group of girls was 
overwhelmed by the size of the building, having come from a small "country" school on Old Falls Blvd. We 
got used to being put down by the city kids but at last we were absorbed and accepted. 

The school was named after the Felton family - a prominent North Tonawanda family which produced 
leaders in government and education. The "look" of this building remains very clear in my mind after all 
these years. It was built of white brick, with a large center section covered at the top of the three stories with 
a soaring dome. It had impressive steps leading to the main door and two wings. Boys and girls entered 
from the ground floor level. 

The Grammar School (Junior High or Middle School) was on the first floor and the Senior High was 
on the next floor. Flights of polished oak steps led to these levels from the coat rooms on the ground floor. 
These rooms consisted of wood partitions with coat hooks every 18 inches of so, one for each pupil. The 
main room consisted of a large study hall in two sections, with nailed-down desks in rows, and a wide aisle 
in the middle for exit use. There were no lockers. Everything was kept in our assigned desk with a top on 
hinges that lifted up. There was no security but I never heard of any incidents of thefts from the coat rooms 
or desks. 

At the front of the hall was a raised platform with one desk at which sat Mr. Myron Rocks, our 
principal. He was loved and respected but very strict. He kept a small "ping" bell on his desk which 
dismissed us with a series of single rings. After everyone was at attention facing the center aisle, the music 
started. At first it was from the high school band upstairs, and later a "Victrola." We marched in rows down 
the stairs to the coat room. There were "watchers" who sent students back to the top if they were out of 
step. 



Freedom at last! We were on our own for one hour to have lunch. There were no tables, no cafeteria 
and nothing to drink except water, but after lunch we were free to leave the building and walk around. A 
candy store, the library, and the city cemetery were nearby. We left the building, rain or shine, warm or cold, 
and it was our responsibility to be back before 1 o'clock. 

The classrooms were off the front and back of the study hall. Bells announced the change of classes. 
As I recall, all the faculty was female except for the gentleman who taught handwriting. As pupils we were 
expected to follow all rules and respect the teachers. I know of no incidents of misbehavior but, if there were 
any, they must have been taken care of appropriately! I have only pleasant memories of classes. 

The second year we moved upstairs as the Senior High left for the new school on Payne Avenue. 
A gym was put in the downstairs after the desks were removed. We lined up according to height. I moved 
from near the front to near the back in one year! Activities consisted mostly of directed exercises, marching 
to music and throwing a basketball back and forth. 

Graduation from 8th grade was held at the new Senior High School in the auditorium. It was a thrill 
I still remember, especially walking across the stage to receive a diploma, rolled up and tied with red or blue 
ribbon. Now in my 80's I can remember many pleasant details. It was certainly a privilege to attend Felton 
School. I think I can safely say that North Tonawanda has never had another building to compare with it. 



Mary Kroening Henry 




Tonawanda Iron and Steel Company, c. 1900 



An early photograph of the Tonawanda Iron Works, before the automobile, which 
changed ownership several times in its 99 years of operation in the City of North 
Tonawanda. The company had its own railroad with 4 miles of track on its property. Two 
engines are visible, one directly above the horse and carriage, and a second on the far 




The Tonawandas, c. 1923 



The aerial view of North Tonawanda and Tonawanda clearly shows the Erie Canal. 
The process of filling in the old Erie Canal from Tonawanda to Buffalo had begun. The 
terminus of the newly enlarged New York State Barge Canal at that time became and 
remains today the Tonawandas Harbor. 





North Tonawanda 



Population 



Annual Income 




Total 34,989 



Male 


16,749 


47.9% 


Female 


18,240 


52.1% 




White 


34,612 


98.9% 


Black 


56 


0.2% 


Am. Indian 


112 


0.3% 


Asian 


129 


0.4% 


Other 


80 


0.2% 


Hispanic* 

' can be of any race 


278 


0.8% 



Population Trends 




Under 5 


2,470 


7.1% 


5-17 


6,239 


17.8% 


18-20 


1,347 


3.8% 


21-24 


1,880 


5.4% 


25-44 


11,340 


32.4% 


45-54 


3,224 


9.2% 


55-59 


1,590 


4.5% 


60-64 


1,823 


5.2% 


65-74 


3,197 


9.1% 


75-84 


1,510 


4.3% 


85 and over 


369 


1.1% 



Top Ancestry Groups 



German 


36.1% 


Polish 


17.4% 


Italian 


9.3% 


Irish 


9.1% 


English 


6.8% 



Per capita $12,722 

Median household $29,576 

Median family $34,987 

Per Capita Income Comparisons 



$16,501 




North Tonawanda County state 



Household Income Ranges 



Less than $25,000 


40.6% 


$25,000-$34,999 


20.2% 


$35,000-$49,999 


21.4% 


$50,000-$74,999 


13.7% 


$75,000-$99,999 


3.1% 


$1 00, 000-$1 49,999 


1.0% 


$150,000 or more 


0.0% 


Education Levels* 


Less than 9th grade 


7.3% 


9th-1 2th, no diploma 


12.9% 


High school graduate 


38.0% 


Some college, no degree 


16.4% 


Associate degree 


10.3% 


Bachelor's degree 


10.0% 


Graduate degree 


5.2% 


‘highest attainment by persons 25 or older 


Types of Households 


Married couple 


57.2% 


Male householder 


2.8% 


Female householder 


10.6% 


Nonfamily household 


29.4% 



Median value $68,100 



Less than $50,000 


19.8% 


$50,000-$99,999 


69.0% 


$1 00, 000-$1 49,999 


10.1% 


$1 50, 000-$1 99,999 


0.9% 


$200,000-$299,999 


0.2% 


$300,000 or more 


0.0% 


‘owner-occupied homes only 





Top Employment Sectors* 



Retail trade 


18.7% 


Manufacturing (durable) 


16.9% 


Health services 


10.8% 


Educational services 


8.7% 


Manufacturing (nondurable) 


8.4% 


Professional services 


5.9% 


Finance, real estate 


4.9% 


Construction 


4.2% 


Wholesale trade 


3.9% 


Transportation 


3.0% 


Public administration 


3.7% 


‘jobs held by residents, regardless of city 


or town of employment 





Lifestyles 



Great Outdoors 


xxxx 


Fit & Active 


XXX 


Arts Scene 


X 


Fine Dining 


XX 


On the Move 


X 


Home Improvement 


xxxx 


Playing the Market 


XX 


High Tech 


XX 


Global Thinking 


X 


Glued to the Tube 


xxxx 


Notes 


Sources: U.S. Census 
Business First research. 


Bureau and 



Source: 1990 Census Business First of Buffalo— Market Profile: Niagara County 




Allen Herschell Co. Inc., c. 1919 

The best-known carousel maker in the United States was Allan Herschell. The 
former manufacturing facility on Thompson Street is now the Herschell Carrousel Factory 
Museum. North Tonawanda played a major role in the amusement park industry, and 
more hand carved carousels were produced here than in the three other major centers 
in the nation: New York, Philadelphia and Abilene, Kansas. 




Allan Herschell Company, Second Floor Paint Room, c. 1919 

Majestic carousel horses made a ride on a merry-go-round a joyful experience. The 
1916 #1 Special Allan Herschell Carousel at the Museum is one of the first produced at 
the factory. There are 36 horses, one chariot and one lovers' tub. 






L 



TONAWANDAS SERVICE CLUBS 



The Zonta Club of the Tonawandas: Zonta is an international service organization of women executives in 
business and the professions. The local club received its Charter in 1931. A service organization, Zonta 
has participated in many worthy undertakings both in the community and internationally, focusing on the 
status of women. In 1966 Zonta established two annual scholarships. Members also participate in and 
donate to Hospice, The McLaughlin Center, Opportunities Unlimited and areas directly concerned with the 
welfare and advancement of women and children. Zonta International has non-government organization 
status with the United Nations on a consultive basis. The U.N. committee's goal is to promote women's 
rights. 

The Exchange Club of the Tonawandas: The Exchange Club is an all-volunteer national service organization 
for men and women who want to serve their community, develop leadership skills and enjoy new friendships. 
The Tonawandas organization was formed on September 17, 1946 and currently sponsors a wide range of 
activities to improve our communities, help the disadvantaged and encourage good American citizenship 
The principal areas of Exchange's National Program of Service are youth, Americanism and community 
service, with child abuse prevention emphasized as the national project. 

The Rotary Club of the Tonawandas: Rotary is an international club of professional and business people 
which was established in 1917. "World peace through understanding" is the club's focus today. Members 
work on various fund raising activities and contributions. The local Rotary donates to area groups such as 
The United Way, hospitals and scholarships. They also sponsor International Student Exchange Programs. 

The Lions Club of the Tonawandas: The Lions Club is part of the world's largest service organization. The 
not for profit club has served the Twin Cities for over 51 years. They focus their efforts on the sight and 
hearing impaired citizens of our area, providing necessities such as frames and lenses, hearing aids, eye 
and ear examinations to those who otherwise would be unable to afford them. Known as the "Knights of the 
Blind," their club motto is "We Serve." 

The Kiwanis Club of the Tonawandas: Members of the Kiwanis Club participate in a number of fund raising 
events. All proceeds are turned back to the community through ball team sponsorships, scholarships and 
the Pediatric Trauma Unit at Children's Hospital. The focus of Kiwanis is youth, reflected in the annual 
circus for kids, Hugh O'Brien Youth Awards, alcoholism and drug abuse coloring contest and other charitable 
donations. 

The Business and Professional Women's Club: Since receiving their Charter in 1939, they have promoted 
full participation, equity and economic self sufficiency for all working women. The BPW serves women by 
offering them a unique network in which they can strengthen their individual empowerment for balancing work 
and family, build leadership skills through community involvement, develop personal and professional skills 
to further their careers and learn about the issues that matter most to working women. The BPW 
membership represents every age, race, religion and political background. They have true strength because 
they represent diverse women working together to make the common voice of women heard. 

The Boys and Girls Club of the Tonawandas: The primary mission of the Club is to enhance the quality of 
life for youth as participating members in a diverse society. The Club promotes, through its fund raising 
efforts, positive relationships and providing behavioral guidance and the promotion of health, social, 
educational, vocational, recreational and character development of youth. The President of the Club for the 
1996-97 year is Jeffrey N. Mis, North Tonawanda City Attorney and the Executive Director is Michael R. 
Basehart. The Club was incorporated in June 1938. The first clubhouse was located at 252 Vandervoort 
Street and the current facility is on Franklin Street, Tonawanda. 




Wintering in Tonawandas Harbor, c. 1911 



The Erie Canal connected the Great Lakes with the Hudson River at Albany, 
opening commerce from the Midwest to the Atlantic Seaboard. Lumber schooners 
delivered their cargo brought from the Upper Great Lakes where the lumber was 
transferred to canal boats to be shipped to its final destination. During the winter, as 
many as 50 ships occupied the harbor between North Tonawanda and Tonawanda, 
because navigation during cold weather was not possible. Looking west from the bridge 
joining Webster Street in North Tonawanda and Main S'reet in Tonawanda, there is a 
clear view of four ships: the H E. Runnels, the Miztec, the Niagara, and the Wyoming. 







Rafting on Tonawanda Creek, c. 1870 



Logs were shipped to the Tonawandas from the Upper Great Lakes. Workers made 
holes in the logs with long-handled drills and chained the logs together to make rafts. 
Iron Pike poles, 14 feet long with a hook on the end, were used to move the logs in the 
water. The log rafts were then shipped east or west on the Erie Canal. The men in the 
photograph from left to right are Matt Scanlon, Pat Scanlon, Dan Burd, William Sutton, 
Martin Scanlon. The sixth person is not identified. 

Directly behind the men is a lumber schooner and to the right of the schooner is the 
"John C. Baker," another lumber ship. In the upper left are stacks of lumber on 
Tonawanda Island and to the right is North Tonawanda. The dock on the bottom is on 
Goose Island in the City of Tonawanda. 



A 



A CHRONOLOGICAL HISTORY OF 
NORTH TONAWANDA 



According to Henry Gonnett, who wrote a U. S. Geological survey, "Tonawanda" is an Indian name 
meaning "swift water," probably suggested by the fast flowing Niagara River. Another explanation comes from 
Arthur C. Parker, authority on Indian Legend and Lore: The name "Tonawanda" is derived from the indian 
word "TA-NA-WUN-DA": it means swift water and refers to that section of the stream which flows over broken 
stone bottom. 

1492: Christopher Columbus discovers America, arriving on the ships Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria. 

1524: In 1524 the explorer Verrazano sailed into the present location of the New York City Harbor. 

1609: Henry Hudson sailed a river, now named after him, from New York City to the site of Albany. 

1615: This territory, including the Tonawanda, was originally populated by an Indian Nation called 

"Neuters," before it was claimed for France by French explorers. Although there is no record of a Neuter 
village in the area, it is believed that villages were established in the natural setting at the mouth of 
Tonawanda Creek. 

1616: Etiene Brule, and in the following year the Frenchman Grenoble, explored the area. The 

Tonawandas area was then geographically a part of the Province of Quebec. 

1626: The explorers were followed by hardy priests, like Pere de la Roche Dallion, who visited the area 

and was followed by Pere Jean de Breheaf. The Jesuits were among the Neuters as early as 1626. 

1643: The Iroquois Indians defeated the Neuter nation. From 1643 until conquest by the white man, the 

Niagara Frontier was controlled by the Seneca Indians, keepers of the western door to the Iroquois Nation. 

1669: Robert Cavalier sieur de la Salle graced these shores for the first time. His visits were repeated 

in 1670 and 1672 and twice in 1679, the year the famous boat "griffon" was built. Father Louis H. Hennepin 
made his first visit to these shores in 1678 and then returned in 1679. LaSalle made his first visit in 1669. 

1679: In December 1678, La Motte de Lussiee and Father Hennepin and others came to the banks of 

what is now Cayuga Creek in La Salle, to build a sailing vessel. This group was joined by La Salle and 
Henri Fonti on January 22. The keel to this famous craft was laid on January 26 of that year. When 
completed, it weighed 60 tons and carried 5 guns. Iroquois who happened along accidently were surprised 
to see this immense boat afloat. The Griffon set sail August 7, after it was determined that it could ride into 
Lake Erie with a good north or northeast breeze. There were 34 men aboard, and the journey to Green Bay 
on the northwest shore of Lake Michigan was uneventful. Indians on the shores of the Niagara watching this 
graceful craft exclaimed "Gannarum," which means "how wonderful." The first explorers claimed this territory 
for France and we were then a part of the province of Quebec. The French enjoyed the friendship of the 
Indians in this area because they paid them well for carrying their merchandise and equipment over the 
portage. When the British took over this territory they used teams of oxen for this purpose, thus taking away 
the Indians only source of revenue and invoking their wrath which brought on the "Devil's Hole Massacre." 

1687: Several Indian settlements were built along the Tonawanda Creek. Many Indians sought refuge 

there after De Nowville's raid. 

1759: On July 24, the battle of "LaBelle Famille" was fought a few miles up river from Fort Niagara, 

resulting in the total defeat of the French by the English. 



1764: In July, the Seneca Indians deeded title to the English of a strip of land on each side of the Niagara 

River, extending from lake to lake. The English strengthened Fort Niagara and built Fort Erie on the west 
bank of the Niagara at the junction with Lake Erie. 

1770: On March 5, the Boston Massacre took place, followed by the Boston Tea Party, on December 16, 

1773, both clashes between the English and the Patriots. The Revolutionary War Battles of Lexington and 
Concord were fought on April 19, 1975, with the participation of Paul Revere and the Minutemen. The Battle 
of Bunker Hill took place on June 17, 1775. 

1776: The Declaration of Independence was signed by the Continental Congress on July 4. The 

Continental Congress ratified the Treaty of Paris on January 14, 1784, formally ending the Revolutionary 
War. 

1777: A State Constitution was adopted in 1777, forming the State of New York, with the Capital at 

Kingston. The State Capital was moved to Albany in 1797. 

1787: The Constitutional Convention was convened in Philadelphia on May 25 by the Continental 

Congress, to create a document to govern the United States of America. On September 17, a total of 39 
of the 42 delegates signed the United States Constitution. New York was 11th out of the original 13 states 
to ratify the Constitution and become part of the United States. 

1797: The Holland Land Company was formed in 1797 by a group of wealthy Dutch who purchased all 

the land west of the Genesee River from the Pennsylvania State line to Lake Ontario and to the Niagara 
River. The purchase was made through Robert Morris who was the financier of the Revolutionary War. 

1800: The entire area, which includes the current site of the Town of Tonawanda, Village of Kenmore, City 

of Tonawanda and City of North Tonawanda, was almost an unbroken forest. The only road to Buffalo was 
Military Road and a part along the river which became River Road. Clearing the land was done by felling 
some of the trees, which were cut into lumber and made into the homes of settlers. Another method known 
as "sloshing" consisted of cutting and burning all trees and brush that hindered farming. Great fires could 
be seen burning for days under careful control. The ash from this process made the land very productive; 
crops were plentiful. Streets were narrow and rough, and paths through the thick woods were for those 
traveling on foot or by horse. 

1801: The first bridge over Tonawanda Creek was erected by the United States Government for military 

purposes. This structure was temporary and lasted for only a short time. After the bridge fell, the crossing 
was done by a rope ferry until 1824. 

1808: Niagara County was established on March 11. It was originally part of Genesee County. Buffalo 

was the County Seat. 

1809: George N. Burger was the earliest known settler. He built a combination house and tavern on the 

shore of Tonawanda Creek, just east of the Niagara River, which later was occupied by the Vincent Koch 
& Company Lumber Yard. 

1810: Joshua Pettit built a log tavern on the premises occupied by the Tonawanda Iron Corporation, now 

the site of Fisherman's Park, beside a small stream which bears his name. He stayed here until 1835, when 
he moved to Allegheny County. Garrett Van Slyke built a tavern on the north side of Tonawanda Creek and 
had two daughters who operated a toll rope ferry across the creek. 

1811: The United States government was becoming concerned over the many incidents that were leading 

the country into another war with the British. Military road was built from Fort Niagara to Fort Porter and 
another bridge was erected over Tonawanda Creek. 



1812 : President James Madison declared war on England on June 1. That same month a Block House 

was built on the south shore of Tonawanda Creek and occupied by a company of 16 regulars. The entire 
frontier was alarmed. The British and Indians captured Grand Island in August. 

1813 : Fort Niagara was captured and burned by the British on December 19. British forces marched up 

the river, destroying everything in their path. Manchester (Niagara Falls) was burned and every Block House, 
including the one in Tonawanda, as well as the almost all the buildings in the settlement, were reduced to 
ashes. On September 10, Captain Oliver Hazard Perry won his great naval victory at Put-in-Bay, Lake Erie. 
His famous message, "We have met the enemy and they are ours," brought joy. The American forces 
invaded Queenstown on October 13 and after sharp fighting were driven with heavy losses. Brock's 
Monument marks the spot of this famous battle. On December 30, Buffalo was set ablaze. The settlers took 
whatever possessions they could carry and move inland. 

1814: The prospects for the war were gloomy. Buffalo, Black Rock and Manchester were in ashes. The 

American forces were rallied and on August 14 the Battle of Fort Erie was fought. 

1815 : Peace was finally declared and the Treaty was signed at Ghent, Belgium on December 24, ending 

the War of 1812. The cost of was tremendous and the articles of peace were not satisfactory. After the war 
the development of the Frontier lagged, but slowly rebuilding began. The slave question began to flare and 
reach our border. The farmers were almost unanimously anti-slave. This question was discussed in log 
huts, beside fireplaces and over pages of rarely possessed newspapers. 

The route of the proposed Erie Canal waterway, from the Hudson River to Lake Erie, was surveyed 
by Dewitt Clinton in 1810 and in his report of 1815, the success of this project was assured. 

1817 : Stephen Jacobs purchased 196 acres two miles down the river from Judge Augustus Porter for 

$8.00 per acre. This land was covered with a thick forest and clearing the land for farming was begun at 
once. This pioneer at the age of 17 was in the Battle of Bunker Hill. The timber for building the first lock, 
where the Erie Canal enters the river, was furnished by him. President James Monroe visited Niagara Falls 
on August 9. The visitors did not stay at Tonawanda, as the entire settlement consisted of a log tavern, a 
rope ferry across the Creek and a few log houses. The first steamer navigating the Niagara River and Lake 
Erie was built in Black Rock in 1817. Her engines lacked sufficient power to drive the boat against the river 
current, so teams of oxen were hitched to the boat by rope and helped pull the steamer to Buffalo, where 
the engines moved the unwieldy craft to the lake. Black Rock at this time had considerable lake commerce. 
Sailing vessels were towed to the lake by oxen attached to long ropes, the boats having no trouble sailing 
down from Buffalo and the lake. 

Construction of the canal started when the first spade of dirt was turned on July 4. When one 
considers the crude implements and machines engineers used during this period, the Erie Canal is truly one 
of the greatest engineering feats of all times. In 1823, construction commenced on the route between Black 
Rock and Lockport. 

1819 : James Carney settled on Tonawanda Island, sometimes called "Carney Island" on some old maps. 

The first steamship crossed the Atlantic. This was the awakening of steam transportation on land and sea. 
A mill was built above the mouth of Tonawanda Creek. 

1820 : A report to the legislature in 1820 said that improving natural channels as parts of the canal system 

was not advisable, except Tonawanda Creek, which was said to afford an example of "a quite narrow bay”. 
The report was signed by Dewitt Clinton, Stephen Van Rensselaer, Samuel Young, Myron Holley, and Henry 
Seymour. A 1824 report from the Canal Commissioners states that ”a great part of the Niagara River above 
the Falls is now a harbor for lake shipping, easy to access and more secure than any other. Boats may 
enter this harbor Tonawanda, with ten miles less of Canal navigation from the Black Rock Harbor and 
fourteen miles less than Buffalo.” 



1821: Erie County was established on April 2. It was separated from Niagara County, with the northern 

boundary of Erie County to include all the land south of the middle of Tonawanda Creek. 

1823: Judge Wilkinson constructed a dam on Tonawanda Creek (near the existing Renaissance Bridge) 

to raise the level of water in the Creek higher than the Niagara River. This allowed boats and barges to 
travel down the canal (where Niagara Street is presently located in downtown Tonawanda, and the long 
stretch of park between Niagara Street and the Niagara River) to the City of Buffalo, without having to fight 
the swift current in the Niagara River. The dam raised the water in Tonawanda Creek four feet higher than 
the water in the Niagara River. This required that a lock be built (now the site of the parking lot off Niagara 
Street, by the Canal Town) to lift boats from the Niagara River going east to Lockport through the canal, or 
lowering them going west, towards Niagara Falls. The dam created a small island between the creek, the 
lock and the canal, which was called Goose Island. The residents of Goose Island had a reputation of 
providing drink and entertainment to the canal workers and boatmen. A Buffalo Land Company bought large 
tracts of land and laid out a future village. The surveyors were Albert H. Tracey and Charles Townsend. 

1824: The State ordered Tonawanda Island sold in the City of Albany, at a public auction. The buyer was 

Samuel Leggate of the City of New York, who bought it for $23.00 per acre. James Carney, an early 
resident of the settlement, was long associated with Frontier activity, having driven an ox team from Lewiston 
to Fort Schlosser for Porter Barton & Co. He also propelled scow boats from Schlosser to Black Rock with 
bundles of salt. James Sweeney purchased his first parcel of land at Tremont and Main Streets. 

1825: The Erie Canal was completed in October at a cost of $7.6 million. Opponents to this new 

waterway called it "Clinton's Ditch." To celebrate the opening, cannons were fired along the side of the 
canal, and in one hour and forty minutes, everyone from New York City to Buffalo was aware of this historic 
event. The first work on this end of the canal was started in Tonawanda and it was very definitely an 
impetus to settlement at the mouth of Tonawanda Creek. At this time, the settlement consisted of a bridge 
across the creek, a few houses and two small stores. 

William Vandervoort purchased 1700 acres of land from the Holland Land Company on the north 
side of Tonawanda Creek, where he built and occupied the one log house side. William Williams established 
a ferry over the Niagara River in 1825 acting under a special act of the Legislature. The ferry traveled from 
the South side of Tonawanda Creek to Grand Island. James Sweeney was also given the right to operate 
a like ferry on the North side of the Creek. The settlement was referred to as Niagara. 

1828: James Sweeney located first in Buffalo in 1811 . He was one of the original owners of that tract of 

land which was to be the Village of North Tonawanda. He built the first frame dwelling. Clearing of the land 
was begun at once to furnish timber for the Buffalo Pier and prepare the way for the sale of village lots. He 
donated lots to the first Methodist Church and the first school house and was generous to destitute children, 
furnishing them with books and clothes. In 1852 his son, John Sweeney, built the first depot and was station 
agent for several years. He also built the first sawmill on site of the Dam waste gates. This was the only 
mill of its kind in this section of the country. 

The Niagara, the first hotel, was built by Vandervoort in 1828 and was destroyed by fire in 1844 . 
When the Boston Company began cutting white oak lumber on Grand Island, he managed a store there as 
a partner. In 1836 the first bank was established in this store. He built the first brick residence for his family 
in North Tonawanda. The completion of the Erie Canal started the migration to the West, defined as all 
territory west of the Allegheny Mountains. Scores of wagon trains filled with furniture, farm implements and 
tools for clearing land, children and livestock came in a never ending parade from the Mohawk Valley to 
Western New York. 



1829: The State Legislature chartered the Ellicott Creek Slack Water Navigation Company to maintain 

slack water navigation in Ellicott creek by means of dams or locks from Williamsville to the junction with 
Tonawanda Creek. In the spring of 1829, Benjamin and Mary Long built a home at the point where Ellicott 
Creek joined Tonawanda Creek. The home still exists today as a historic site The Long Homestead is 
owned by the City of Tonawanda and maintained by the Historical Society of the Tonawandas. 

1833: Daniel Webster was an interested party in 1833 when his company, formed in Boston, Mass., 

purchased 16,000 acres of white oak timber on Grand Island for $5.00 per acre and began cutting and 
sending it to the Atlantic seaboard where it was used in the shipbuilding industry. Stephen White, manager 
of the East Boston Co. from Salem, Massachusetts, purchased Tonawanda Island as his home. He built the 
mansion which stood on the South end of this Island, near where Steamers Restaurant is located today. 
This magnificent mansion was named "Beechwater" and the interior was finished in solid cherry and black 
walnut from Boston and marble mantels imported from Italy. Stephen White occupied this home for ten 
years. His daughter married the son of Daniel Webster, Fletcher. The mansion was eventually demolished 
to make room for additional piles of lumber. Daniel Webster, the eminent statesman, was a frequent visitor 
to this area, staying at the White Mansion on such visits. Many parts of the hulls of the famous Yankee 
Clippers, which firmly impressed traders in the early part of the nineteenth century and established in United 
States as a youthful country with radical ideas and as a naval power, were made of white oak from Grand 
Island. It was the lumber venture that brought Daniel Payne Baxter, an expert millwright to this area, from 
New England, along with his four sons. Baxter’s specialty was erecting sawmills and putting in the 
machinery. He and his sons settled on Grand Island. Later two of his sons immigrated to the West in Prairie 
Schooners. The Boston Company’s Store brought Louis S. Payne as clerk. 

1836: The first school was erected in the area which now includes Main and Tremont Streets, the site now 

occupied by the First Methodist Church. The building was approximately 20 feet by 30 feet. There were 21 
taxpayers and 12 non-taxpayers living in the settlement at this time. The first steam railroad in Western New 
York, the Buffalo and Niagara Falls line, was opened and ran on the right of way through Main Street in 
Tonawanda and Webster Street in North Tonawanda. The line was completed September 6. The whistle 
of the locomotive echoed through the woods. This line was later taken over by the New York Central 
System. 

The Town of Wheatfield was established on May 12. The Town of Tonawanda was established 
from the Town of Buffalo on April 16. The Town of Tonawanda included Grand Island which became its 
own township in 1852. 

1837: The second Seminole War was fought on the Canadian side of the Niagara River. The Americans 

along the border were in sympathy with the Insurgents. A small American steamship, the "Caroline," carried 
supplies to a party of insurgents on Navy Island. An English force was sent from Chippewa, Canada 
opposite Niagara Falls, New York and found the vessel on Grand Island. The British killed 12 men, towed 
the boat into the river and set it on fire. It drifted down the river and over the Falls. 

1838: Dr. Jesse F. Locke was the first resident physician to locate in the Tonawandas, starting practice 

in the village and continuing until his death in 1860. The laws of 1838 provided for the navigation of the 
Tonawanda and Ellicott Creeks, promoting their use in connection with the canal. 

1839: Henry P. Smith was a pioneer lumberman . He started rafting logs from the shores of Lake Erie 

to the Tonawandas. His descendant, Henry P. Smith III, was a United States Congressman serving the City 
of North Tonawanda for a number of years. 

1842: The First Methodist Church was established at Main and Tremont Streets on land donated by 

Colonel John Sweeney. The present structure was built in 1880. 



1843: Martinsville was established when Carl Sack, Edmund Wurl and Fred Grosskopf purchased 1700 

acres of land from William Vandervoorte at $15 per acre on Tonawanda Creek in the Southeast corner of 
the Town of Wheatfield, 4 miles east of the Village of Tonawanda. The first families, from Germany, came 
to this country to escape religious persecution. The first Lutheran Church was built in 1846 . Martinsville was 
named after the Lutheran leader, Martin Luther. 

1847: Lewis S. Payne, who settled in 1841 built a home in what is now North Tonawanda. It was then 

the first ward of the Village of Tonawanda. The home was located near the crossing of the Canandaigua 
Branch of the NYC Railway over Tonawanda Creek. Nearby, he built the first steam saw mill. Later Colonel 
Payne became one of the City's most prominent citizens and had a farm on the corner of Wheatfield Street 
and Payne Avenue, the highest point in the area. It is believed that Wheatfield Street was named because 
it was a direct lane from the Colonel's wheat fields to the docks on the river. A public school, now the 
Community Center, was built on land donated by his heirs and is named after him. He is also credited with 
encouraging New York to build the State Ditches in this section, which reclaimed much swamp land. 

1848: North Tonawanda was chiefly populated by canal boatmen and their families. When some 

Cleveland capitalists, attracted by the possibilities of port advantages as a point for shipping lumber and 
grain, set up operations, the population of the settlement began to grow. 

1849: The Cleveland Commercial Co. bought 500 feet of river frontage and built an elevator capable of 

storing 250,000 bushels of wheat. This company made improvements to the harbor and gave a public 
square to Tonawanda as well as sold many building lots on long credit. The elevator burned in 1857 and 
the concern moved to Buffalo. 

1850: The Tonawandas began to assume the proportions of a lumber port in the latter part of this decade. 

This activity marked one of the outstanding periods in our history. The industry enjoyed a steady expansion 
for nearly 40 years, until timber near the water's edge of the upper lakes became so scarce that it could no 
longer be shipped or floated down to the head of the canal. The lumber was not carried by wagon was 
floated and towed in great rafts chained together and brought here to be sawed into lumber and shingles. 
The whine of great saws and the whir of joiners filled the air with men working twelve hour shifts for wages 
of $ 1.50 to $ 2.00 per day. This new commerce, coming into the small village, was to transform it overnight. 
Municipal problems were multiplied many times. Fire protection became a serious matter and water supply 
just as pressing a concern. Better transportation facilities both for workers and for shipping out the lumber 
were needed. The streets, surfaced with loose gravel, were practically impossible after a rain and very rough 
and dusty when dry. 

1851: William Domfeld started a Dry Goods and General store in a sunken canal boat, retrieved from the 

water. He built the Martinsville Hotel where the Martinsville Post Office was formerly located. 

1852: The Town of Grand Island was established. It was formerly part of the Town of Tonawanda. 

1854: The beginning of the movement which resulted in North Tonawanda's withdrawal from the original 

Village of Tonawanda, is credited to a resolution offered at the May 6 meeting of the Village Board of 
Trustees. This resolution provided that all monies collected from the taxable residents of the First Ward, 
presently known as North Tonawanda, should be expended for the benefit of the streets of that Ward. The 
resolution was tabled, then again resurrected in 1857 

1855: The Tonawanda Village Board authorized the First Ward to withdraw from the Village of Tonawanda. 

1856: William Domfeld and Christian Fritz purchased a saw mill in Martinsville, which was built by Joseph 

Hewitt and located on Sawyer Creek, where Niagara Falls Boulevard was built. In 1860, Christian Fritz built 
his own mill and Dry Kiln to supply the surrounding County. 



1857: The Village of Tonawanda consisted of three wards in that section of the village, now the City of 

Tonawanda, and one ward in that part of the old village, now known as the City of North Tonawanda. The 
boundaries which formed North Tonawanda at this time were: the Niagara River, Tonawanda Creek, Division 
(Mile) Street and Wheatfield Street. There were frequent disputes over which side of the creek should 
receive the most improvements. A disagreement over highway money to be spent was settled temporarily 
by leaving the decision to the street committee which had equal representation. The "Gravel Incident", 
involved a dispute over the transportation of stone from the gravel pit at Thompson Street and Payne Avenue 
(located behind the current North Tonawanda City Hall) to repair roads in the Wards located across 
Tonawanda Creek (currently the City of Tonawanda). 

1857: An act was introduced in the New York State Legislature to separate North Tonawanda's ward from 

the Village of Tonawanda. This act also provided for the governing of North Tonawanda as a part of the 
Town of Wheatfield, and it remained such for 8 years. 

1861: On August 12 the Confederate Army opened fire on Fort Sumter, a Union Army stronghold, located 

in Charleston, South Carolina. In the fall, Colonel Payne, at his own expense, formed a Civil War company 
of volunteers, part of the 100th Regiment, which was recruited from western New York in Buffalo. He 
landed at Newport News, Virginia, in April 1862, with his regiment and formed a part of Casey’s Division, a 
Division of McClellan’s Army in the famous Peninsula Campaign. His regiment took up their position on 
White Oak Station. Colonel Payne was in the Battles of Williamsburg and Seven Pines. He is buried in 
Elmwood Cemetery. The Civil War battles of Antietam, Fredricksburg and Shiloh took place during 1862, 
as well as the battle between the iron clad ships Monitor and Merrimack. 

1863: The biggest campaign of the Civil War took place at Gettysburg Pennsylvania, on July 1 through 

July 3, resulting in a Union Army victory. The Union Army, under General Sherman, invaded Georgia in 
1864 and marched to the sea. 

1865: An act was introduced in the New York State Legislature on May 8, incorporating the Village of 

North Tonawanda. The name "Village of Niagara" was originally considered and used for a short period of 
time; however, there was already a City of Niagara Falls and a Town of Niagara, so the name North 
Tonawanda was finally chosen. The boundaries were increased to the present size of the City of North 
Tonawanda. It had a population of 440 people. The villages of Martinsville and Gratwick were annexed to 
North Tonawanda. Colonel Lewis S. Payne was elected Niagara County Clerk in 1865 and a Member of the 
New York Assembly in 1869. He was later elected as a New York State Senator. 

Confederate General Robert E. Lee surrendered to Union General Ulysses S. Grant on April 9, in 
the Town of Appomattox, Virginia. President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated on April 14 in Washington 
D.C. The Civil War ended. Approximately 650,000 soldiers had lost their lives. 

1866: A map of the City shows that Main Street was the original Military Road. Its name was later 

changed to Webster Street, in honor of Daniel Webster. Railroad tracks ran down the center of the street. 
Goundry School was constructed and was staffed with four teachers and a principal. The former school site 
is currently an empty lot, located next to the former Andrew Carnegie Library. 

1868: On February 12, the Colonel John Sweeney Rural Cemetery was founded, located across the street 

from City Hall on Payne Avenue. Many old residents are buried in this cemetery, to include graves from the 
old Tonawanda Burying Grounds, formally located along the Niagara River, south of Tonawanda Creek. 

1870: The Hydrant Hose Company had a fire station located on Sweeney Street, next to the Delaware 

Street Bridge. The current location of the Historical Society of the Tonawandas is located in the old New 
York Central and Hudson River Railroad Station at 1 13 Main Street, originally constructed this year and used 
as a depot until 1922. 



1872 : The first permanent banking business was founded by Edward Evans on June 1. It was succeeded 

on May 1, 1877 by the firm of Evans, Schwinger & Co. These banks were followed by the State Bank on 
May 1, 1883. The Armitage - Herschell Company, which made steam engines and boilers, was started this 
year and began building carousals in 1883. By 1891, the company was building more than 100 carousels 
a year. 

The Niagara River Iron Company was established. The Company purchased 165 acres of land from 
M. Bush along River Road. The buildings were erected in 1873 and manufacturing operations began the 
same year. The blast furnace was designed for an output of 50 tons of pig iron per day. The Company dock 
was 500 feet long and reached a 10 foot depth of water. A large crane raised freight from vessels. The 
last buildings were erected in 1895 and occupied an area of 4 acres. Branch tracks of the New York Central 
served the site. Fisherman's Park is currently located at this former industrial property. 

1874: The Village Council House was built at a cost of $5,000. It was located on Thompson Street, 

between Oliver and River Road. This building had sections for fire apparatus and the jail on the first floor, 
Council rooms on the second floor and a hose and lookout tower also. 

1875 : A new bridge was built using a wrought iron structure, weighing 50 tons. It was erected by the 

Wrought Iron Bridge Co. of Canton, Ohio. 

1876 : On May 7, twenty men met for the purpose of establishing a fire company. On May 15 the Village 

Board approved their request and formed a volunteer fire company called the North Tonawanda Bucket 
Company, later to be called the Columbia Hook and Ladder Company #1. They were located at the Village 
Council House on Thompson Street. In 1914, the first motorized fire truck was delivered to the City and was 
assigned to Columbia Hook and Ladder. 

1880: A construction contract for a stone bridge on Oliver Street over the state ditch, which has since 

been tiled and covered, was awarded to Frederick Schultz for $622. The proposed macadamizing of 
Webster Street to be paid for by public subscriptions was considered. The residents of Christiana Street 
wanted the name of the street changed to "Maple" but the petition was tabled. 

1882: The figures for lumber shipments exceeded those of Chicago, when the Tonawandas became the 

lumber market supreme. Tonawanda Island, or Wilkinson Island, was practically a wilderness, being 
occupied only by White's old mansion, which for years had been falling into decay. The Island was 
purchased in 1881 or 1882 by Smith Fassett & Co. After this purchase, a bridge was built and the 
wilderness was gradually pushed back until the island became entirely industrial. The area of the Island is 
85 acres, the greatest part of which was covered with lumber, soon after its purchase by Smith Fassett & 
Co. The turn of the century brought gradual changes, and for another 30 years the lumber industry slowly 
declined until it had been practically all replaced with other industrial activities, including iron and steel 
businesses, lumber finishing, chemical processing, plastics and musical instruments, radios and other 
concerns meeting modern demands for new products. 

1883 : It was the custom of the Village to discharge the police force about the time navigation on the lakes 

and canal was closed by cold weather. The sailors and canalers caused the constabulary endless trouble 
when they came ashore. This element gave the Village the reputation of being the roughest port in the 
World. Alert Hose Company was incorporated March 3 and was located near the old labor hall on Thompson 
Street. 

1884 : A proposition from the Michigan Pipe Company to lay four miles of pipe and construct a pumping 

station and boiler house at a total cost of $20,000 was investigated. Census figures showed that the 
population was 2509. The DeGraff Mansion, located on the corner of Payne Avenue and Goundry Street, 
was built and was the first home in the Tonawandas to have indoor plumbing. 



1885: Several local citizens were given permission to form a water company, and a project was initiated 

under private control and then taken over by the municipality. Activity of the new water company was the 
highlight of this year. In September, village President Thompson and Trustees Batt and Oelkers took a flat 
boat out into the river past Little Island and at various intervals on the way across filled jugs with water 
sealing them and marking the location. A Buffalo Chemist analyzed the contents of the various containers 
and showed that the best water was obtained about half way across. Eventually the Council transformed 
this process into the modern system which today provides pure, filtered water from the Niagara River. Water 
pipes were made of wood. Occasionally even now one is found in excavation to be well preserved. Pipes 
were supplied by the Hobbie Ayrault Co,, which began production in 1857, after incorporation in 1885, with 
capital of $50,000. The water obtained by the Holley System from the Niagara River was supplied to both 
of the villages of Tonawanda and North Tonawanda. At the Council House on Thompson Street, the public 
approved a proposition to permit the new company to install 72 hydrants in six miles of wooden mains. 

In January a progressive citizenry, with George P. Smith as founder, organized the first municipal 
water works system after many offers were considered by private concerns. Mr. Smith was a man withf 
many plans for his village. He organized two trolley companies, building lines to Buffalo and operating 
service in both Tonawandas. He had franchises for cross town lines but did not use them. He also built the 
only "skyscraper" at Webster and Tremont Street, the Smith Building, and assisted in the development of 
other portions of the business section. 

The Tonawanda Gas Light Company had been granted permission to lay 4 miles of pipe line and 
a contract was signed to light 125 street lamps at $15 per year each. James Warren was given the contract 
for cleaning and lighting 100 new street lamps at 80 cents per day. A fine of $25.00 was fixed for anyone 
caught turning stop cocks on the new lamps; and persons convicted of hitching their horses to the lamp post 
were fined $5.00. Police records do not show any violations of these ordinances. An atmosphere of 
romance surrounded the Lamplighter. As the shades of night were falling, children used to wait his coming. 
He would turn on the gas with a key on the end of a long stick, then with a light enclosed in an iron tube 
lowered down, the gas was ignited. He passed from post to post down the street, leaving behind him a row 
of bright lights in the glass globes, and then disappeared around the corner. The advent of Electricity stole 
his occupation, but his art is enshrined in memory and song. 

1886: The new water works was tested on December 24 in the presence of village officials, firemen, 

residents and visitors from Tonawanda and other communities. According to the previous agreement, the 
company was to furnish sufficient pressure to throw streams of water from 12 separate hydrants at least 80 
feet in the air. The day of the test was cold and a high wind prevailed, causing many persons to expect 
failure. But contrary to pessimistic anticipations, the Village records show the new hydrants hurled columns 
of water from 85 to 125 feet perpendicularly into the air. This new method of throwing water on a fire 
relegated the steam pumper to comparative inactivity. 

River pollution was a problem even at this early date. Objections were registered about Buffalo 
Sewage in the Niagara River polluting the waters that flowed past the Tonawanda intake. The Village 
Janitor's salary fixed at $1.00 per day. His duties were to take care of the Council House on Thompson 
Street and lighting of the kerosene street lamps on Webster and Tremont Streets. James Ryan, Sr., was 
appointed. The Little Island Swing Bridge was proposed. Island Street, in response to a petition from lumber 
men, was laid out from Main Street to the proposed site of the bridge. 

Citizens petitioned the council to require the New York Central Railroad to provide either watchmen 
or gates at the nine grade crossings in the village after many fatal accidents. Trains traveled through the 
village at 30 or 40 miles per hour, because there were no ordinances regulating speed of trains through the 
village. All property owners were required to trim trees that were less than nine feet from the pavement so 
the gas street lamps could throw more light. If the property owners refused to comply, it was ordered done 
and the cost was assessed against the property. 



1886 : In April, Bell Telephone Co. applied for permission to erect a line of "symmetrical painted posts 40 

to 60 feet high" on the west side of Webster Street. Permission was denied so Manhattan Street was 
substituted. 

The creation of a Central Fire Headquarters was suggested. The village leased a part of the Gravel 
pit property on Robinson Street from the New York, Lake Erie and Western Railroad. The New York Central 
and Hudson Railroad was granted a permit for a bridge over Tonawanda Creek. 

On March 1, the "Ironton Boys" submitted a petition to the North Tonawanda Village Council asking 
to be recognized as a fire organization. On March 6, the Common Council granted their petition and 
authorized the creation of the Active Hose Company No. 2. The Village Council approved a lease for a 
parcel of land at 84 Robinson Street between Marion Street and the tracks, as the location of the Hose 
House. On September 7, 1897, the Council ordered a horse drawn, 4 wheeled hose wagon at a cost of 
$325. The Active Hose supplied the horse. On July 14, 1917, the first motorized pumper, at a cost of 
$8,246, was delivered to the City and assigned to the Active Hose. 

Gratwick Hose Company No. 6 was also organized by the Village Council. The Companies first 
fire station was on Felton Street, the current site of Riley Gear, and was dedicated on July 28, 1892. Their 
current fire station is located at 110 Ward Road and was dedicated in 1964. 

1887 : In April, the Common Council authorized the creation of the Live Hose Company No. 4. On July 

18 the Council designated the Live Hose to act as a salvage company until the Village could purchase hose 
for the cart. On January 3, 1888, Live Hose was given the old Alert Hose quarters on Thompson Street, 
which was shared with Columbia Hook and Ladder. 

The village fathers were confronted with many petitions from railroads for switches to be extended 
across streets to reach new lumber yards and mills that were springing up in many sections. There were 
petitions filed against such switches by citizens, but the minutes of the village board show that such petitions 
were disregarded. The New York Central obtained a switch across Vandervoort in spite of the objections, 
with the understanding that it could connect with a lumber yard on the gravel pit site but that no gravel should 
be removed. The new City Hall now graces one end of this property, as the lumber industry and the railroad 
switch have long disappeared. A fine recreation field occupies the other end of this area. Goundry street 
opened, while litigation for this right of way cost the village $1,000. 

1888 : The North Tonawanda Police Department was organized on April 20 with two patrolman under the 

command of Chief Charles Kohler, with the primary function of improving the quality of life for the residents 
by controlling drunks and vagrants and to watch for fire in the lumberyards at night. The salary of a police 
constable was $144 per year, prorated for the time served, which began in the spring and ended in the fall. 
The First telegraph fire alarm system was installed by the Utica Fire Alarm Co. It was connected with a bell 
at headquarters and a gong in the Council House. Ten strokes of bell was for a fire. Fifteen strokes 
indicated a general assemblage of the people and two strokes for more water pressure. A stringent fire 
ordinance governing the operation of the system was then adopted. The Census showed 3383 or 607 
families lived in the Village. William Clark was the census taker and was paid $20 for his work. He visited 
every family. The new Village Board of Trustees now had a membership of 6. 

Tonawanda Electric Co. received permission to run pole lines and wires for lighting homes with 
electricity. B. F. Betts was hired to make the first map of the village copies of which were filed with County 
and State. The Board required all real estate transfers to be recorded on this. There were six miles of docks 
along the Niagara River, and by 1888 the Tonawandas became the second largest lumbering port in the 
world. 






1888: Webster Street was paved. The Village Trustees voted to spend $800 for a new Hook and Ladder 

Fire Truck, which was dedicated on May 12 and $2,900 for street lighting. Two miles of water main 
extensions were authorized in supplementary contracts with Tonawanda Water Co. The first catholic church, 
Ascension, was constructed in 1888 at its current site. It burned and was rebuilt in 1894. 

1889: Auto Wheel Coaster was founded and through the years maintained an excellent name in the sled 

and wagon business. The company went bankrupt in 1964 and burned down. 

1890: On June 10 the Niagara Savings and Loan Association opened for business. 

1891: On January 26 Rescue Fire Company #5 held its organizational meeting. The first known fire 

station was on Old Falls Boulevard, near Lockport Road. The Company's current fire station is located at 
Strad Avenue. The first trolley system serving the Tonawandas, called the Tonawanda Street Railroad 
Company, was formed. 

1892: Pine Woods School was constructed on the site of the parking lot for Park Lanes Bowling. The 

DeKleist Organ Works, the forerunner of the Rudolph Wurlitzer Company, began operations. 

1893: The Public Library received its charter from New York State. 

1894: The Village Council authorized the organization of Sweeney Hose No. 7. The Gratwick Trolley Line 

opened on June 30 and went out of business in 1922. 

1897: As the lumber business and other industrial ventures grew, there was a requirement for additional 

municipal services to support the expanding Village. A movement to become a City arose, which caused 
quite a bit of political wrangling. Finally, an act was introduced in the New York State Legislature on April 
24, 1897, incorporating the City of North Tonawanda. Albert E. Keen, Village President, became the first 
Mayor. The sidewalks were made of wooden blanks and the streets were gravel. The Tonawandas' Armory 
was built in 1896 and formally dedicated in 1897. 

1898: The Rand Ledger Company was established to manufacture, promote and sell special record 

keeping equipment and supplies. This company was the later named Remington Rand Inc. and was located 
on Sweeney Street, east of the Delaware Street Bridge. 

1899: A proposal to build a bridge across the Niagara somewhere between Buffalo and Tonawanda was 

made for the purpose of lowering experimental apparatus into the current to develop electricity. The Council 
sent a lengthy resolution to Governor Theodore Roosevelt when the bill authorizing the structure was placed 
before him, requesting his veto on the basis that navigation to the lumber ports would be endangered and 
prosperity of the Twin Cities threatened. The resolution stated among other things that there was unloaded 
annually on the Twin City docks between 500 million and 700 million feet of lumber and from eight to sixteen 
million pieces of lath; from 30 to 66 million shingles. The docks covered five miles of water front in North 
Tonawanda and about two miles in Tonawanda. Iron ore shipped into North Tonawanda amounted to 
250,000 tons. At a special election taxpayers voted $15,000 for street lighting and a contract was signed 
with the Tonawanda Power Co. for $12,000. 



1899: A telephone franchise approved by the Council was vetoed by Mayor Ollie because he thought it 

did not favor the City enough and did not stipulate rates. Another draft was submitted a few months later 
when the City asked for a free telephone in the Fire Chiefs residence. This was also rejected by the City, 
this time by the council and in 1900 definite telephone terms on which the City would do business were 
outlined by the Aldermen. These included a term not to exceed 50 years, a flat rate in the City and to 
Tonawanda of not more than $36 for a business phone and $18 for a private phone, ten free telephones to 
the City offices and a guarantee of ample protection to the City offices and its residents from damage and 
injury from the lines. The toll charge to Martinsville was 250. The franchise was with the Bell Telephone 
Co. and was finally passed during Mayor Smoyer’s term. The City got eight free telephones. Another project 
of the Aldermen was to negotiate a three cent fare on the Gratwick trolley between North Tonawanda and 
Gratwick. In the election, the proposition of spending $30,000 for sewers in Ironton and 40 streets east of 
Oliver Street was voted on, as well as $9,000 for reconstruction of the Council House in Thompson Street. 

1900: The Village Board authorized moving the City Hall and Police Department from the Thompson Street 

building, which would still house fire vehicles, to the YMCA Building on the corner of Main and Tremont 
Streets, currently the sales lot for Flanagan Chevrolet. The City rented space at this building. Sweeney 
Hose moved into its new quarters on Schenck Street, near Niagara Street. On April 24 the Village Board 
adopted formal rules and regulations for the Police Department. The first traffic signal was installed. 

1901: Felton School was constructed at Bryant and Thompson Street and became the first High School 

in the Village. Goundry School became a grammar school, and in 1926 Felton School also became a 
gammar school. 

1902: The City entertained The Western New York Volunteer Firemen Association. The Board of Trustees 

was active and stated the population was over 10,000. 

1903: The City accepted a gift of $20,000 from Andrew Carnegie for the construction of a Library. 

1904: The Carnegie Library was built in the center of town at 240 Goundry Street. It was one of nearly 

3,000 libraries built in the United States between 1885 and 1919 with money donated by the wealthy 
industrialist, Andrew Carnegie. The building is listed on the State and National Registry of National Historic 
Places. A children's room was constructed downstairs in 1938 to relieve overcrowding. The first TNT 
Football Game took place in 1904, with the Lumberjacks beating the Warriors 18 to 6. On January 27, one 
of the worst fires in the history of the City destroyed the Lumber Company and Yards of White, Rider & Frost 
on Tonawanda Island, burning for four nights and three days. 

1906: The Board of Public Works on March 26 presented a resolution limiting the speed of “Motor 

Vehicles to one mile in six minutes on the city streets and alleys.” (10 miles per hour). 

1908: On August 23 the City Market, located on Robinson Street and Payne Avenue, opened for business. 

The facility is often referred as the Farmers' Market, and is open all year round. 

1909: Columbia Hook & Ladder built a new building at a cost of $4,000, at 252 Oliver Street. It served 

as Fire Headquarters until 1972, when it was sold for $11,500. 

1910: The Wurlitzer manufacturing plant, located on Niagara Falls Boulevard, purchased the old DeKleist 

Barrel Organ Company. 

1 91 2: On October 1 st, the Common Council responded to petitions from Active Hose, Alert Hose, Gratwick 

Hose, Live Hose and Sweeney Hose and appointed full time drivers/horse care takers for each firehouse, 
at a cost of $60.00 per month. This action is thought to be the start of the paid department as we know it 
today. The United States Post Office, now on the National Historic Registry, was built at its present site. 



1914 : The United States Congress declared the War against Germany on April 6. Germany surrendered 

a year and a half later, and the armistice was signed at 11 a.m. on November 11, 1918. During the war 
8,020,780 military personnel were killed; 50,585 were American soldiers. Thirty seven of the American 
soldiers were boys from North Tonawanda who made the supreme sacrifice in World War I. Their names 
are inscribed on the Heroes Memorial, midway across the Renaissance Bridge, between Tonawanda and 
North Tonawanda as well as at the War Memorial, in Brauer Park, next to City Hall.. 

Many North Tonawanda men were represented in every branch of the service during World War 
I. At the opening, local candidates for officers’ positions were sent to training camps at Madison barracks, 
Fort Niagara and the Great Lakes Training Station. When the Draft law became effective, most of the men 
taken were sent to Camp Dix and Camp Upton. Company K, 74th Infantry was used for guard duty until 
August 1918 when it was designated as a company of the 108th Infantry and sent to the western battle front 
with the 27th Division. Here our boys did valiant work in breaking the Hindenburg Line and participating in 
other offensives. At home other men formed the Home Guard to do local guard duty while the women of 
the community volunteered for the Red Cross and the Boy Scouts sold War Savings stamps. 

Ground was broken on April 13 for the construction of DeGraff Hospital. The first patient was 
treated on December 4. The hospital concept was initiated by LeGrand Simson DeGraff, Army surgeon Dr. 
John A. Rafter and the Mayor of North Tonawanda in 1913, when they decided to build this project at a cost 
not to exceed $40,000. The current hospital is located on the original site and is the result of many 
expansion projects. The hospital was named after LeGrand DeGraffs father, James H. DeGraff. 

The City placed in service its first piece of motorized fire apparatus on October 1, a Hook & Ladder 
truck assigned to the Columbia Hook & Ladder Company. The truck was destroyed in an accident on March 
30, 1929. The Panama Canal was completed at a cost of $336 million. It took ten years to build the 40 mile 
canal, which spans Central America between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. 

1918 : The "High Speed Line" was officially opened on June 9 and for a long while was the fastest and 

most comfortable mode of travel between Buffalo and Niagara Falls. The travel time from the foot of Main 
Street in Buffalo to the foot of Falls Street in Niagara Falls was approximately one hour. This line was 
discontinued August 20, 1937 and demolition began September 28. A severe flu epidemic occurred 
pressing the services at Degraff Hospital. The YMCA, located at the current site of Flanigan's Chevrolet, 
used its gymnasium to accommodate cots. City Hall and the Police Department were also located in this 
building. 

1919 : On May 22, the Police Department obtained its first mechanized patrol vehicle, a motorcycle. A 

single span railroad draw bridge, with a cement counter weight, was constructed to allow larger tug boats 
and barges to pass underneath. The bridge was lifted only once. The New York Central Railroad tracks 
were relocated to this bridge from their original location, down the middle of Main Street. 

1921 : Durez Plastics and Chemicals Company, located on Walck Road, was founded. The company 

founder, Harry M. Dent, selected North Tonawanda for his business enterprise because he considered it the 
center of the market area for plastics. The plant manufactured phenolic resins and molding compounds. 
The original name was General Plastics Inc., which was changed to Durez in 1939. Oxidental Chemical 
closed the facility in 1996. 

1924 : International Paper, located on Tonawanda Island, started operations in 1924. After fifty years of 

business, the facility closed in 1974 and moved to New England. 

1925: The Rand Ledger Company merged with the KARDEX Company to form the Remington Rand Co., 

located on Sweeney Street. 



1926 : The Rivera Theater was opened on December 30, 1926, with silent black and white movies, 

accompanied by the sound of the Mighty Wurlitzer Organ. It has a seating capacity of 1,200 and was later 
renamed the Riviera. The Niagara Frontier Organ Society purchased the historic theater in 1989 and it has 
been restored to its original magnificence. A new High School (currently Lowry Middle School) was 
constructed on Payne Avenue and graduated its first class in June 1927. Felton School became a grammar 
school. 

1927 : The first television set was developed. 

1929 : The new City Hall, located at Payne Avenue and Thompson Street was completed and dedicated, 

at a cost of $200,000. The American Legion was given permission to erect a Memorial Hall next to the 
building in Brauer Park. The council approved the purchase of municipal Incinerator Plant for garbage and 
other waste disposal, iocated on Walck Road and Zimmerman Street. The Stock Market crashed. 

Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt visited this area on July 11 on his inspection tour of the Barge 
Canal, which replaced the original Erie Canal, as a guest of the City of Buffalo. The cost of the construction 
and equipment for the canal was $175 million. The Bill authorizing the creation of the Niagara Frontier 
Bridge Commission was signed on April 13 by Governor Roosevelt. The newly formed Commission met on 
June 1. In this same year Governor Roosevelt approved an appropriation of $250,000 to purchase land for 
the approaches of the Grand Island Bridges. The total cost of this project was approximately $8 million. 

1933 : Tondisco Inc., was founded by Norman Ackerman and Roy Glawf as the Tonawandas Distributing 

Corp., at 91 Scott Street, Tonawanda. In 1952 it moved to their current location at 80 Thompson Street. 

1935 : The Grand Island Bridges were formally opened and dedicated on July 15. 

1937 : Industry was booming in North Tonawanda. Some of the companies doing business were: Buffalo 

Bolt Co., Wurlitzer Manufacturing Co., Remington Rand Inc., American District Steam Co., International 
Paper Co., Tonawanda Steel Inc., Van Raalte Co., Buffalo Steel Co., Creo-Dipt Shingle Co., Auto Wheel 
Coaster Co., Spillman Engineering Corp., Richardson Boat Co., Victor Safe Co., Tonawanda Corrugated 
Box and Durez Chemical. 

1939 : Three Mile Island, which was created by the construction of the Barge Canal, and is now the main 

part of Ellicott Creek Park, was geographically a part of the City of North Tonawanda and Niagara County. 
The county of Erie petitioned the State of New York for its use, and on May 1 it was transferred to the 
County of Erie. 

The Active Hose Fire Hall was constructed, with the grand opening held on May 13. Two classic 
films, the " Wizard of Oz" and " Gone with the Wind" were released. 

In September, World War II started in Europe when Germany invaded Poland. 

1940 : According to the United States Census Bureau, the 1940 population of the City of North Tonawanda 

was 21,900. 

1941 : Pearl Harbor, the United States Naval Base in the Pacific Ocean, was attacked by the Japanese 

on December 7. President Roosevelts declares this "a date which will live in infamy." The United States 
formally entered into World War II by declaring war against Japan and Germany. 

1944 : The Battle of Normandy, which was the invasion of Europe by the Allied Armies began on June 6, 

referred to as "D-Day." This was the final drive to liberate Europe. 



1945 : On May 8, Germany surrendered at General Eisenhower's headquarters in Reims, bringing an end 

to the war in Europe. On August 6, the first atomic bomb is dropped on the Japanese City of Hiroshima. 
On September 2, Japan surrenders to General McCarther on the deck of the USS Missouri, anchored in 
Tokyo Bay, bringing a close to the war in the Pacific. During Would war II, it was estimated that a total of 
15 to 20 million military personnel lost their lives. United States military personnel deaths were approximately 
292,000. Of the total, 103 men were from North Tonawanda. Their names are identified at the War 
Memorial, in Brauer Park, next to City Hall. 

1947 : Memorial Pool was built and dedicated on July 4. The Fire Station at Payne Avenue and Walck 

Road was built to house Truck #2, the hook and ladder. 

1950 : According to the United States Census Bureau, the 1950 population of the City of North Tonawanda 

was 24,731. The Korean conflict began on June 25, when North Korean soldiers invaded South Korea, 
crossing the 38th parallel. Drake School was constructed in the 1950's. 

1951 : Payne Avenue Plaza, now known as MidCity Plaza opened with ten stores. The stores included: 

The Sample, WT Grant Co., Your Host Restaurant, Niagara Savings and Loan, Marine Trust Co., and Alan 
Mack Pharmacy. Many of these store fronts were torn down in 1996 to allow for the new Sears Hardware 
Complex. The first main frame computer, UNIVAC (Universal Automatic Computer) was produced by 
Remington-Rand and was used by the United States Bureau of Census. 

1953 : The Korean Conflict ended on July 7, when an armistice was signed between the United States and 

the North Koreans. Politically and militarily, the war was inconclusive. Approximately 1.5 to 2 million military 
personnel were killed during this conflict. Among them were approximately 23,300 American soldiers, and 
13 were from the City of North Tonawanda. Their names are identified at the War Memorial in Brauer Park, 
next to City Hall. 

1954 : In Vietnam, the battle of Dien Bien Phu resulted in a victory of the Viet Minh by defeating the 

French. The French withdrew from Indochina and the United State presence in the country of Vietnam 
increased at this point. The first nuclear powered submarine Nautilus was launched in January. 

1955: Melody Fair opened in the original round tent on its present site. The permanent structure was built 

in 1974. A great spurt in home construction opened Meadow Drive through from Payne Avenue and Jesella, 
Pioneer, Moll and Master Streets all opened this year. 

1956 : The original Sewage Treatment Plant was built. Prior to this the City discharged its sewage directly 

into Tonawanda Creek or the Niagara River. 

1957 : Grant School is expanded to accommodate the increase in student population. Dr Seuss publishes 

the children's book The Cat in the Hat . 

1958 : The Live Hose Company No 4 dedicated their new fire station on January 25, located at Goundry 

and Vandervoort Street. The United States Government creates the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration to coordinate our efforts in space. 

1960 : According to the United States Census Bureau, the 1960 population of the City of North Tonawanda 

was 34,757. The Tonawanda News moved from downtown to its present larger location on River Road. 

1961: The Catholic Diocese opened Bishop Gibbons High School. Astronaut Alan Shepard makes the 

first United States suborbital space flight on May 5 aboard the spacecraft "Freedom 7." The Berlin Wall was 
constructed, dividing the German City of Berlin into East Berlin and West Berlin. 



1962: The North Tonawanda High School, dedicated this year, cost $3,850,000 to build to accommodate 

a student population of 1,800. Astronaut John Glenn became the first American to orbit the earth on 
February 20, 1962. He orbited the earth three times aboard the spacecraft "Friendship 7." The Cuban 
Missile Crisis began on October 16 when an American U-2 plane photographed missile launch sites in Cuba, 
resulting in the Naval blockade of Cuba, which ended on October 28 when the Soviets missile sites were 
dismantled and withdrawn. 

1963: Ohio Elementary School was dedicated. The City Green House and Botanical Gardens were 

opened. President John F. Kennedy is assassinated on November 22 in Dallas Texas by Lee Harvey 
Oswald, who was subsequently killed by Jack Ruby. The Beatles, a musical group from England, released 
their first recording in 1963, "Please Please Me", followed in 1964 by their second hit "I Want To Hold Your 
Hand." 

1964: The new quarters for Gratwick Hose Company No. 6, located at 110 Ward Road, was dedicated. 

The Tops Supermarket on Goundry Street opened. The store closed in 1997 when the new Tops Super 
Store opened in the City of Tonawanda. 

The United States government, involved in the Country of Vietnam since the mid 1950's, escalates 
its military involvement. This was based on the Gulf of Tonkin incident, when United States vessels were 
allegedly attacked by North Vietnamese torpedo boats, resulting in a Gulf of Tonkin Resolution, on August 
2. In simple terms, it was the South Vietnamese and the United States governments against the Viet Cong, 
a revolutionary movement in South Vietnam and the North Vietnamese government, separated by the 17th 
Parallel. The Tet Offensive started on January 30, 1968, resulting in the attack of provincial and district 
capitals, including the United States Embassy in Saigon. Our involvement peaked in 1968, at a troop 
strength of approximately 549,000 men. The conflict dragged on until the Paris Peace Accords were signed 
on January 31, 1973. During the Vietnam Conflict, it was estimated that a total of 1.1 million military 
personnel lost their life. United States military personnel deaths exceeded 58,000. Of that total, 12 were 
from North Tonawanda. Their names are identified at the War Memorial in Brauer Park, next to City Hall. 

1965: The Sugar Bowl, a local institution, closed when the Pullman Brothers decided they no longer 

wished to continue the ice cream parlor business on Webster Street. On July 4, Gratwick Riverside Park 
was dedicated during ceremonies highlighting the Village Centennial. The Houston Astrodome, which is the 
nation's first totally enclosed stadium, is constructed in Texas. 

1966: On October 4 a meeting was held with former Coach George J. Vetter and the North Tonawanda 

Football Hall of Fame became a reality. The Hall of Fame building is located behind the old Carnegie 
Library. The Van Raalte Company site was taken over by the Downtowner Motor Inn, later the Packet Inn. 

1967: East Robinson Street was extended from Zimmerman Street through to Division Street to provide 

access to the Powerline Plaza, located at Division and Erie. The Division Street Arterial, following the old 
high speed line was authorized. 

1968: Reszel Junior High School opened. Civil Rights leader Martin Luther King is assassinated in 

Memphis Tennessee on April 4. Presidential candidate Robert Kennedy is assassinated in California, during 
his political primary victory party, on June 4. 

1969: Felton Grammar School was demolished. Luther Manor, a senior citizens apartment complex 

occupies the former site. American astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin land on the moon on July 
20, coining the phrase "One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." The Woodstock Music and 
Art Festival takes place in Bethal, New York, from August 15 through 17, attracting 500,000 people. 

1970: According to the United States Census Bureau, the 1970 population of the City of North Tonawanda 

was 36,012. 



1971 : Bishop Gibbons High school closed and the complex was converted into Bishop Gibbons 

Apartments for senior citizens, which opened in 1980. 

1972 : On June 28 the new Fire Headquarters, located at 495 Zimmerman Street, was dedicated. The 

building is the current home of Engine No. 7 and Ladder Truck No. 2. A general alarm fire burned the Auto 
Wheel Coaster Company on May 29. 

1973 : The North Tonawanda Youth Center was authorized on March 27. The Senior Citizens Center was 

authorized on October 1 and moved into the Carousel Park Complex on February 28. On January 31, the 
Paris Peace Accords were signed, resulting in the withdrawal of United States military personnel, return of 
POWs and the end of our military involvement in Vietnam. 

1974 : The Wurlitzer Plant produced its last jukebox. President Richard Nixon resigns the presidency after 

the Watergate Incident. 

1975: The City of North Tonawanda constructed a new 25,000 square foot Library building on Meadow 

Drive to replace the smaller Carnegie building. On July 4, the new facility was dedicated. The Carnegie Art 
Center now occupies the old library. Construction on the City's new 18 hole golf course was completed and 
it was dedicated on September 1. On January 28 the fire station at Nash Road and Deerfield Drive was 
dedicated. On April 30, the City of Saigon fell to the North Vietnamese Army, thus ending our presence in 
that country. 

1976 : The United States of America celebrates its Bicentennial on July 4. 

1977 : The Blizzard of 1977 took its toll on Western New York. While the City of Buffalo was under a 

winter siege for a week, North Tonawanda streets were all passable within two days. Singer Elvis Aron 
Presley, who was born on January 8, 1935, died on August 16. 

1979: The city dedicated the new Central Garage, located at 758 Erie Avenue, which is the current home 

of the Department of Public Works. Elizabeth C. Hoffman was elected the first woman mayor of North 
Tonawanda and served from 1979 until 1992, when she won a seat in the New York State Assembly. 

1980 : According to the United States Census Bureau, the 1980 population of the City of North Tonawanda 

was 35,717. A chemically contaminated section of Niagara Falls, the Love Canal, was declared a disaster 
area. Cable News Network (CNN), a 24 hour news channel, created by Ted Turner, broadcasted for the first 
time. 

1981: The new Wastewater Treatment Plant was placed into operation. The plant and sanitary sewage 

delivery system cost more than $42,000,000. Although it was funded in part by the Federal and State 

Governments, the City's share of cost exceeded $10,000,000. This plant is one of three existing physical- 
chemical plants in the United States. It was designed and built to handle the waste discharges of many 
industries, now no longer located in the City. Music Television (MTV), a 24 hour music video channel, was 
launched. 

1982: On November 13 the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated in Washington, D.C. It consists 

of a bronze sculpture of three soldiers and a V-shaped Wall bearing the names of American soldiers killed 
during the Vietnam Conflict. 

1983: Canal Fest was initiated by the Chamber of Commerce of the Tonawandas. It is a week long 

celebration of the canal heritage of the Tonawandas. Family oriented fun, includes the TNT Tug of War, a 
giant parade, craft show, beauty contest, bed races, boat parade car show, water skiing, boat building and 
racing and fireworks. This celebration is currently run by Canal Fest, Inc. After the Tug of War competition, 
the Mayor of the losing City must push the winning City's Mayor over the bridge in a wheelbarrow. 



1985: The former Herschell Carrousel Factory Complex was purchase by the Carousel Society of the 

Niagara Frontier and converted into a museum dedicated to preserving the heritage of the hand-carved 
carousel. The museum offers displays, special exhibits and wood-carving demonstrations. The Society 
acquired an 1916 carousel, originally made in North Tonawanda, restored it on site, and now offer rides on 
this historic merry-go-round. More carousals were manufactured in North Tonawanda than in the City's three 
major United States competitors combined: New York, Philadelphia and Abilene, Kansas. 

1986: The United States Space Shuttle Challenger exploded after liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center 

in Florida on January 28, killing all the astronauts aboard. 

1989: The Berlin Wall, built in 1961 to separate the sections of east and west Berlin, was torn down. In 

1990 the re-unification of Germany took place. 

1 990: According to the United States Census Bureau, the 1 990 population of the City of North Tonawanda 

was 34,989. On August 2, Iraqi military forces invaded the Arab State of Kuwait, which started the Gulf War. 
After Operation Desert Shield turned into Desert Storm, the war was won in a few days and a surrender took 
place on February 28, 1991. 

1994: A new Science wing is added to the Senior High School, while Meadow School is expanded. 

1995: George D. Maziarz was elected to the New York State Senate, representing the 61st District, and 

is still serving as our Senator. A new gymnasium/auditorium is added to the Senior High School. 

1996: The high school athletic fields were constructed and opened, and the old concrete bleachers at 

Vetter Field were demolished in 1997. At this point, the TNT football record for 87 games is the Lumberjacks 
with 49 wins, the Warriors with 29 wins and 9 ties. The City bonded $1.3 million to construct an additional 
9 holes at the City owned Deerwood Golf Course. The Canadian government legalized gambling in Niagara 
Falls, Ontario and the Casino opened in December. 

1997: The City of North Tonawanda celebrated its Centennial Birthday on April 24. A party took place 

at the new High School Auditorium that evening, and many members of the community participated in this 
historic event. A giant Birthday Cake with 100 candles was presented. The Beard Growing contestants were 
recognized and the City's Centennial musical piece, "The Redwoods," was played by the school band for the 
first time. A dance concluded the evening's activities. James A. McGinnis is the current Mayor of the City. 





North Tonawanda City Hall, c. 

City Hall at Payne Avenue and Brauer Park was constructed in 1929 at a cost of 
$200,000. It occupies the site of the infamous "gravel pit" that led to the separation of 
the Village of Tonawanda into two areas: one north of the canal and another south of the 
canal that eventually became the Cities of North Tonawanda and Tonawanda. 



P 

Independence Day Parade, c. 1915 

An elaborately decorated float heads down Oliver Street, just south of the Odd Fellows 
Hall at Schenck Street. Three carousel animals adorn the festive float, a rooster at the 
head and two giraffes, with young firefighters astride, pulling the hose reel. The former 
Wittkowsky Photography Studio is visible behind the rooster. 




DEGRAFF MEMORIAL HOSPITAL: 
GROWING UP WITH THE TONAWANDAS 



Having responded to the changing health and wellness needs of the Tonawandas for over 80 years, 
DeGraff Memorial Hospital pauses during the North Tonawanda Centennial of 1997 to look back down the 
road it set out on in 1914 to its present path on the "Road to Wellness." The hospital is looking ahead to 
serving our communities in the next Century. 

On June 13, 1913, LeGrand Simson DeGraff unveiled a plan to construct a community hospital in 
North Tonawanda. DeGraff, a prominent businessman, lent his leadership, financial resources and ultimately 
his name to the hospital which would serve the Tonawandas. On November 30, 1914 DeGraff Memorial 
Hospital was unveiled to the public, and the first patient was admitted on December 4, 1914 at the cost of 
$1.30. 



In June of 1948, the hospital was converted into a voluntary institution, owned and operated by a non- 
profit community corporation. The years between 1950 and the early 1990's saw numerous fund raising 
campaigns, expansion projects, technological and patient-care advances. The DeGraff Hospital Foundation 
(the fund raising arm of the hospital) was incorporated in 1983. DeGraff Hospital became a member of the 
Voluntary Hospitals of America in 1986, joining a national alliance of hundreds of locally-owned, not-for-profit 
hospitals. 

When DeGraff Hospital first opened, its purpose was to treat and care for the medically sick and 
injured. In the 1990's, caring for these individuals is still very much a part of the hospital's mission, but now 
we must be committed to meeting the entire health and wellness needs of the community. This means 
caring for people not only when they are sick but also when they are healthy -- in order to ensure they stay 
healthy. 

Today, DeGraff Memorial Hospital is a 155-bed health care facility which provides ambulatory surgery, 
cardiac rehabilitation, driver rehabilitation, physical, occupational and speech therapies, an Oncology and 
Infusion Center for cancer and blood-related disorders, and the only Medical Rehabilitation Unit in Niagara 
County. The DeGraff Adult Day Care Center cares for mentally and physically impaired adults of our 
community. The McLaughlin Center of DeGraff maximizes the health and well-being of older adults and their 
families with a wide variety of programs and services. DeGraff also operates a network of primary care sites 
including Tremont Medical, PC and DeGraff Family Medicine, and enjoys partnerships with area businesses, 
educational institutions and other providers. 

Incorporated in this, the centennial year of the City of North Tonawanda, DeGraffs "Wellness 
Network" provides comprehensive assessment, education, and lifestyle modification programs for all 
individuals. The hospital will remain active as an organization dedicated to joining with and leading our 
community on the road to wellness. 

LeGrand Simson DeGraff would scarcely recognize the hospital he founded back in 1914, but the 
dedication and commitment of the staff and volunteers working within the hospital is still as great as it was 
83 years ago. 




DeGraff Memorial Hospital, c. 1920 




White's Mansion on White's island, c. 1900 



In 1833, the East Boston Timber Company acquired more than 15,000 acres of white oak 
forests on Grand Island. White Oak, used for building large sailing vessels, was 
transported on the Erie Canal to shipbuilding facilities. 

One of the major investors in the East Boston Company was Daniel Webster, 
statesman and orator. Stephen White managed the company from his elegant mansion 
on the southern tip of "White's Island," constructed in 1835. Daniel Webster's son, 
Fletcher, married Stephen White's daughter, Caroline. 

White's Mansion, called "Beechwater," was torn down in 1906 to provide additional 
lumber storage space. Tonawanda Island became the official name of the island in 1900. 
Through the years, it had many names: Carney Island, Liggett's Island, White's Island, 
and Wilkeson Island. 



NORTH TONAWANDA CITY STREETS 



WEBSTER STREET: Named after Daniel Webster, who was investor in the East Boston Company 

of Massachusetts, which purchased acres of white oak on Grand Island. While visiting here, he stayed 
in the White Mansion on Tonawanda Island, home of Stephen White who represented the company. 
Stephen's daughter, Caroline, married Daniel's son, Fletcher. 



SWEENEY STREET: Named after James Sweeney who donated land for the first public school 

house and John Sweeney who was a colonel in the War of 1812 and developed the local train station. 

PAYNE AVENUE: Named after Lewis S. Payne who lived at the highest point in the area, the 

corner of Payne and Wheatfiled Street. He had a farm and built the first steam sawmill. He was a 
famous scout during the Civil War, became County Clerk, State Assemblyman and State Senator. This 
street was originally called Forest Street, because of the thick forest. 

WHEATFIELD STREET: This lane was a direct route from Colonel Payne's wheat fields to the docks 

at the river. 

DIVISION STREET: Originally named Mile Road because a treaty required a boundary line, which 

followed the curve of the Niagara River, to be located one mile from the river. 

GOUNDRY STREET: Named after George Goundry, who owned a great deal of land with the 

Sweeney Brothers and set up some of the village streets. 

CHRISTIANA STREET: Named after Christiana Long Smith, who was the daughter of Benjamin and 

Mary Long, builders of the Long Homestead in Tonawanda, and wife of Henry P. Smith. 

VANDERVOORT STREET: Named after William Vandervoort, who purchased land from the Holland Land 
Company, built a hotel and the first brick mansion in North Tonawanda. 



THOMPSON STREET: 
EVANS STREET: 
LINCOLN STREET 
GRANT STREET: 
WITMER ROAD: 
ALLEN STREET: 



Named after James S. Thompson, Village President from 1885 to 1887. 
Named after Edward Evans, who founded the first banking business. 
Named after President Abraham Lincoln. 

Named after President Ulysses S. Grant. 

Named after Tobias Witmer, an engineer and surveyor. 

Named after Edward Allen. 



CARRUTHERS STREET: Named after Wallace Carruthers. 



DOEBLER DRIVE: 



Named after Wilhelm Doebler. 



FASSETT STREET: 



Named after F. S. Fassett, Village President in 1879., 



FELTON STREET: 
HAGEN AVENUE: 
HEWITT STREET: 
MILLER STREET: 
OELKERS STREET: 
ROBINSON STREET: 
SOMMER STREET: 
THOMAS FOX: 
STANLEY STREET: 
WARD ROAD: 
ZIMMERMAN STREET: 



Named after Benjamin Felton, Village President in 1891 . 

Named after Charles Hagen. 

Named after William Hewitt. 

Named after Henry and Edward Miller. 

Named after John E. Oelkers, Village President in 1892. 

Named after Charles Robinson. 

Named after Frederick Sommer, Village President from 1888 to 1889. 
Named after Thomas Fox, killed during the Vietnam War. 

Named after Henry Stanley. 

Named after William Ward. 

Nelson and Frederick Zimmerman. 




PAVING WEBSTER STREET, NORTH TONAWANDA, NEW YORK - 1913 
The photographer Is looking north toward Goundry Street. 

The store at the left is the White Elephant Cafe, and to its 
right is the tobacco store of J.C. Beltz, 



NORTH TONAWANDA TROLLEY LINES 






The trolley lines were the main means of transportation preceding the bus service of today. There were four 
main lines operating within our city limits: 

1884: The Gratwick Line was known as the Buffalo, Kenmore and Tonawanda Line and was opened on 
June 30, 1984. This route came across the bridge from Young and Delaware down Main Street, Goundry, 
Vandervoort, Robinson and Oliver Street, to the intersection with Ward Road and returned. This was the 
local line and was well patronized. It was discontinued on July 1, 1922. 

1895: The Old Buffalo-Niagara Falls Line was opened September 20, 1895. It operated from the foot of 
Main Street in Buffalo to Sweeney Street, Payne to the Gratwick trestle which took the cars over the Erie 
and New York Central Railroads at the north end of the city limits (the stone abutments, the only evidence 
of this line, are still standing), then down River Road to Buffalo Avenue, to the foot of Falls Street and 
returned. There are many happy memories of rides to the Falls on weekends and holidays. This line was 
discontinued on July 1, 1922. The car barns which stood on the east end of the Gratwick trestle were 
demolished on November 26, 1935. 

1900: The Lockport Line used the tracks of the Erie Railroad and the First station was Goundry Street where 
a waiting room and newsstand stood. The next stops were Oliver, Payne, Division and Niagara Falls 
Boulevard in Martinsville, and thence to Lockport and returned. This line was used by those having business 
in Lockport, the County Seat, and carried a great many passengers before the advent of the automobile and 
the bus. 

1918: The "High Speed" Line was officially opened on June 9, 1918 and for a long while was the fastest 
and most comfortable mode of travel between Buffalo and Niagara Falls. Travel time from the foot of Main 
Street in Buffalo to the foot of Falls Street in Niagara Falls was approximately one hour. This line was 
discontinued on August 20, 1937 and demolition began September 28. The tracks were built on an 
embankment, with bridges going over many streets, including Sweeney, Tremont, Goundry and Christiana. 
The City purchased the right of way which was a high embankment running north along Division Street from 
the canal across Wheatfield toward Walck Road where it tapers down to a normal level at the Payne Avenue 
crossing. A large part of the fill in the "China Wall" came from the old Payne Hill which was a famous 
sleighing and skiing spot in the winters of the good old days. Removal of the embankment was completed 
in the 1960's. 




North Tonawanda Street Railroad, c. 1893 

The North Tonawanda Street Railroad provided public transportation in the years 
before the advent of the modern bus. The trolley was stopped at the intersection of 
Goundry Street and Main Street next to the Hotel Sheldon, one of several hotels that 
existed in the downtown area during the heyday of the lumber industry. 




Rudolph Wurlitzer Company, c. 1945 



In 1910, the Rudolph Wurlitzer Company opened its North Tonawanda Division 
when it acquired the facilities of the Eugene DeKleist Musical Instrument Manufacturing 
Company and then built the Wurlitzer Plant. The prominent tower housed the huge water 
tank for the 750,000 square foot plant. Farney Wurlitzer, an avid gardener, took great 
pride in the beautiful flowers and landscaping shown in the photograph. 

The Wurlitzer Company became the largest manufacturing company of its kind in 
the world. Automatic musical instruments, pianos, band organs and theatre organs were 
made in North Tonawanda. When the Rivera opened on December 30, 1926, a classic 
"Mighty Wurlitzer" was there; it remains today. A Wurlitzer band organ provides the 
festive music which makes a ride on the 1916 merry-go-round at the Herschell Carrousel 
Factory Museum special. The Museum recently purchased the perforating equipment 
used to make the rolls for band organs. Thousands of juke boxes were also produced by 
Wurlitzer, with the last one made in 1974. Manufacturing operations ceased in 1975. In 
1978, the Wurlitzer Plant was sold and became the Wurlitzer Industrial Park, which now 
houses a diversity of industrial and service businesses. 



NORTH TONAWANDA POLICE DEPARTMENT 



The North Tonawanda Police Department was organized April 20, 1888, with 2 patrolmen under 
the command of Chief Charles Kohler, with the primary functions of improving the quality of life for the 
residents by controlling drunks and vagrants, and to watch for fire in the mighty lumber yards at night. 
The Police station was located at the YMCA building, at the corner of Main and Tremont Streets, currently 
the location of the Flanigan Chevrolet Sales lot. By 1896, the force consisted of 6 patrolmen and a 
sergeant, under the leadership of Chief John F. Ryan. Formal rules and regulations for the department 
were adopted by the Village Board on April 24, 1900. The City’s first traffic signal was installed around 
this time to control the influx of vehicular traffic. 

On May 22, 1919, the department obtained its first mechanized patrol vehicle, a motorcycle 
operated by Patrolman Albert Kasbaum. Approximately three months later, on August 18, 1919, the 
machine contributed to his death, when he was shot by the operator of a stolen vehicle on Niagara Falls 
Boulevard. On November 1925, Frank X. Kinzly was appointed Chief to oversee 4 sergeants and 6 
patrolmen. Prohibition was in full swing and the department was busy enforcing the unpopular law. 

In May 1927, Frederick Hoefert was appointed Chief. In May 1929, the Police Station moved from 
the YMCA building at Main and Tremont to the new City Hall at 216 Payne Avenue. One of the great 
controversies over the move was complaints from citizens that the outside lights at the old station were 
green while white lights had been installed at the new station. In January 1946, Norris E. Gillespie was 
named Chief, the rank of sergeant was abolished and 3 Civil Service Captains were appointed. Captain 
Beilein died in the line of duty on his 58th birthday, October 10, 1949, when he was overcome by toxic 
fumes in a house on Lousia Parkway. 

A one-way radio transmission system, from the Police Station to the Police car, was installed. This 
was soon replaced with 2-way radios. Patrick F. Grimaldi was appointed Chief May 1, 1951, to head a 
force of 40 officers. The present Auxiliary Police organization was formed in May 1951, with over 85 
citizen volunteers under the leadership of Captain Robert E. Butler. The New York State standardized 
Basic Police Training was instituted in 1965 and the first canine, “Prince Von Bruno," a German Shepherd 
joined the force. School Crossing Guards replaced the four-way stop signs that Police Officers had to roll 
in and out of the street on school days. Modern communication systems put to rest the antiquated hard- 
wire call box with a flashing red light atop and the Police shoulder patch became part of the uniform in 
1969. 



Under Chief Frank P. Malone, appointed April 5, 1971, further modernization took place. The New 
York State- Wide teletype system was replaced with a nationwide computer based system for motor vehicle 
and operator information, and "wants and warrants" on individuals. DWI breath testing equipment came 
into use and radar was used to check the speed of motor vehicles. Compact, hand-held two-way radios 
were becoming available and a tape recorder captured telephone and radio messages to and from 
headquarters The jail was remodeled and a pistol range was built. (Officers previously practiced in the 
garage at City Hall, much to the annoyance of the neighbors.) Tine position of Drug Enforcement Officer 
was instituted to combat a new social and criminal problem, use of illicit drugs. 



The eighth and present Chief, Lloyd C. Graves, was appointed July 26, 1985. The current 
department has a Chief, 6 Captains, 4 Lieutenants, 34 Uniform Patrol Officers, 4 Detectives (including 
drug enforcement), 2 Juvenile Aid Officers, a Public Safety Officer, a Range Officer, a Court Security 
Officer, a Traffic Enforcement Officer, a Police Automotive Mechanic, 3 full time Clerks, 4 part time Police 
Matrons, 2 part time Clerks, 23 School Crossing Guards, and 35 Auxiliary Police Officers. On November 
25, 1986, the Enhanced 9-1-1 emergency telephone system became a reality and is now used over 7,000 
times annually to summon fire, medical, or police assistance. The Community Alert Network went on line 
April 6, 1987. Within 3 months, on June 26, the Alert system proved very useful when a new Mobile Gas 
Station on Division and Robinson Streets developed a piping leak, spewing thousands of gallons of highly 
explosive gasoline into the sewer system. Hundreds of people were notified and evacuated to safer areas 
within minutes through the mass notification process available with “CAN” computer magic. The first 
Neighborhood Watch meeting was conducted in the fall of 1987 by a group of Wurlitzer Park residents. 
The concept and results were so outstanding that the program spread city wide. The first D.A.R.E. class 
in the City was conducted in the fall of 1990. On April 6, 1990, the Common Council authorized the 
second Departmental canine, “Abby," a bloodhound. 

April 1991 heralded in the new age of computers for the department with the installation of a Local 
Area Network and on January 1, 1993, the first codified Departmental Standard Operating Procedure, 
including amended rules and regulations, was adopted. The Zero Tolerance Domestic Violence Program 
kick-off with federal, state, and local officials was launched February 14, 1997. During the last 100 years, 
including the present force of 53, one hundred fifty-eight police officers have proudly served the City of 
North Tonawanda. 




North Tonawanda City Hall, c. 1926 



City Hall was originally located at the corner of Main and Tremont Streets in a 
building that also housed the Police Department and the YMCA. The First United 
Methodist Church, constructed in 1880 on land donated by Colonel John Sweeney, has 
been a prominent landmark in the downtown area since that time. 

The three automobiles are a 1924 Dodge Coupe (Chief Ryan's car), a 1920's Dodge 
patrol wagon, and a 1926 Model "T" Ford. Flanigan Chevrolet now occupies the former 
City Hall site. 



NORTH TONAWANDA FIRE DEPARTMENT 



The North Tonawanda Fire Department is known as one of the best paid and volunteer 
departments in the nation. The first City Fire Chief was Louis J. Wattengel, who started his service in 
1897. As we celebrate our Centennial, the Fire Chief is David A. Rogge. The majority of the fire stations 
were located in the south west corner of the City, because that is where the industry was located. As the 
residential population shifted away from this part of the City, so did the newer fire stations. 

In December. 1911, the Common Council received a petition from the members of Active Hose, 
Alert Hose, Gratwick Hose, Live Hose and Sweeney Hose for a full time driver and horse care taker for 
each firehouse. On October 1, 1912, the Common Council appointed drivers at a cost of $60.00 per 
month. This action is thought to be the start of the paid department as we know it today. 

In 1870, municipal records indicate that the Hydrant Hose Company had a fire station on Sweeney 
Street, next to the Delaware Street Bridge. 

On May 7, 1876, twenty men met for the purpose of establishing a fire company. On May 15 the 
Village Board approved their request and formed a volunteer fire company called North Tonawanda 
Bucket Company, later to be called the Columbia Hook and Ladder Company #1. Originally located at 
the Village Council House on Thompson Street, they moved to 252 Oliver Street in 1914. The first 
motorized fire truck was delivered to the City and was assigned to Columbia Hook and Ladder. In 1947, 
the fire station at Payne Avenue and Walck Road was built to house the Hook and Ladder Truck. 
Members of the company respond to service in Truck 1, a 1980 Pierce 100 foot Aerial Ladder, located 
at the fire station at Nash Road and Deerfield Drive, built in 1975, and Truck 2, a 1974 Stuphen 85 foot 
Aerial Platform, located at Fire Headquarters, 495 Zimmerman Street, built in 1972. 

On March 1, 1886, the "Ironton Boys" submitted a petition to the North Tonawanda Village Council 
asking to be recognized as a fire organization. On March 6, the Common Council granted their petition 
and authorized the creation of Active Hose Company No. 2. The Village Council approved a lease for a 
parcel of land at 84 Robinson Street, between Marion Street and the tracks, as the location of the Hose 
House. On September 7, 1897, the Council ordered a horse-drawn, 4 wheeled hose wagon at a cost of 
$325. Active Hose supplied the horse. On July 14, 1917, the first motorized pumper, at a cost of $8,246, 
was delivered to the City and assigned to Active Hose. On May 13, 1939, the Active Hose fire station at 
427 Oliver Street was dedicated by the City. Members of the company respond to service in Engine 2, 
which is a 1971 LaFrance pumper. 

In 1886, Gratwick Hose Company No. 6 was also organized by the Village Council. Their first fire 
station was on Felton and Knoll Streets, the current site of Riley Gear, and was dedicated on July 28, 
1892. Their current fire station is located at 1 10 Ward Road and was dedicated in 1964. Members of the 
company respond to service in Engine 6, a 1993 Ferrara pumper. 

In April 1887, the Common Council authorized the creation of Live Hose Company No. 4. On July 
18 the Council designated Live Hose to act as a salvage company until the Village could purchase hose 
for the cart. On January 3, 1888, Live Hose was given the old Alert Hose quarters on Thompson and 
Kent Streets, which was shared with Columbia Hook and Ladder. On January 25, 1958, the Live Hose 
fire station at 71 Vandervoort Street was dedicated. Members of the company respond to service in 
Engine 4, a 1989 American Eagle pumper. 



On January 26, 1891 Rescue Fire Company No. 5 held its organizational meeting. Their first 
known fire station was on Old Falls Boulevard, near Lockport Avenue. Their current fire station is located 
at 1241 Strad Avenue. Members of the company respond to service in Engine 5, a 1975 Ward LaFrance 



In 1894, the Village Council authorized the organization of Sweeney Flose No. 7. In 1900, 
Sweeney Flose moved into its new quarters at 412 Schenck Street, between Niagara and Fasset Street. 
On June 28, 1972, the new Fire Fleadquarters at 495 Zimmerman Street was opened, the new home for 
Engine No. 7 and Truck No. 2. Members of the company respond to service Engine 7, a 1974 Ward 
LaFrance pumper. 

The Fire Department currently consists of the following equipment: 5 pumpe.s, 2 ladder trucks, 
1 rescue vehicle, 3 cars, 1 pickup truck and 5 reserve fire engines. The Department has 51 paid 
firefighters. 




Village Council Flail and Live Flose Company, c. 1895 



The Village Council Flail and Live Flose were located on Thompson Street between 
the railroad tracks and Oliver Street. The facility built in 1874, also served as the first 
City Hall after North Tonawanda became a city on April 24, 1897. Municipal offices were 
located on the second floor. 




& 



NT 

Centennial 
Birthday 
Party Cf Dance 



Thursday , April 24, 1997 



High School 
Auditorium 
7:00 - 11:00 p.m 

Doors Open 6:00 p.m. 



Girts, 

Cake 

& 

Ice Cream 



nwj 



UW)7 



NORTH TONAWANDA 



Remington Rand Company, c. 1925 

The Remington Rand Company, a leading manufacturer of office products, occupied 
approximately 150,000 square feet of space at Sweeney and Marion Street, just east of 
the downtown business district. The company produced the first main frame computer, 
used by the Census Bureau. The former Remington Rand facility still houses industrial 
concerns. 




CONGRATULATIONS TO THE WINNER 
OF OUR CENTENNIAL LOGO CONTEST 



Casey Anderson's winning design was the inspiration for our Centennial logo. 
The contest was open to all city school district students. The logo will adorn 
stationery and commemorative souvenirs related to our Centennial celebration. 
Casey and his proud parents, Norman and Marley Anderson, have resided in 
North Tonawanda for seven years. An eighth-grade student at Reszel Middle 
School, Casey has previously been recognized for outstanding achievement in 
art. He participates in an advanced "studio in art" class. Future aspirations lie 
in the study of architecture or perhaps automobile design. Look for an 
"Anderson Building" or the "Caseymobile" around the first quarter of the Twenty- 
First Century! Mary Lou Pieper, teacher and Common Council member, 
coordinated the contest with assistance from Melinda Wright, art teacher at 
Reszel Middle School. 






CHURCH HISTORY 



Abundant Life Assembly of God: The church is located at 1001 East Robinson Street and was incorporated 
on October 19, 1956 as the Evangelistic Center. 

First Baptist Church: The church is located at 530 Meadow Drive and was organized on September 6, 1885 
with 18 members. The original church was erected at 190 Vandervoort Street in 1888. 

Payne Avenue Christian Church Disciples of Christ: The church is located at 350 Wheatfield Street and was 
dedicated on January 28, 1980 as Payne Avenue Church of Christ at Payne Avenue and Christiana Street. 

Saint Mark's Episcopal Church: The church is located at 61 Payne Avenue and was established on February 

17, 1869 at Marion and Tremont Streets. 

Abiding Savior Lutheran Church: The church is located at 1534 Ruie Road and was founded in 1959 at the 
corner of Ruie Road and Cambridge Avenue. 

Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church: The church is located at 375 Payne Avenue and was founded on 
January 21, 1906 at Oliver and Thompson Streets. The cornerstone was laid on June 29, 1924 at Payne 
Avenue and Robinson Street. 

Saint Mark Lutheran Church and School: The church is located at 1135 Oliver Street and was established 
in 1891. 

Saint Martin Lutheran Church: The church is located at 322 Old Falls Blvd. and was organized in 1843. St. 
Martin celebrated its sesquicentennial in 1993. 

Saint Matthew Lutheran Church: The church is located at 875 Eggert Drive and was organized on January 
13, 1890. 

Saint Peter's Lutheran Brethren Church: The church is located at 275 Bryant Street and was organized as 
the Evangelical Lutheran Church in 1887. 

Saint Paul's Lutheran Church: The church is located at 64 East Felton Street and was founded on October 

18, 1888 on Washington Street. 

Saint Paul Lutheran Church and School: The church is located at 453 Old Falls Blvd. and was organized 
in 1861 in "Martinsville." 

Redeemer Lutheran Church: The church is located on Falconer and Thompson Streets and was organized 
in February 1897 in Tonawanda and moved to Schenck Street in February 1899. Redeemer is celebrating 
its centennial in 1997. 

First Free Methodist Church: The church is located at 958 Nash Road and was organized in 1950. 

First United Methodist Church: The church is located at 65 Main Street and was organized in 1816. First 
services were held in Robert Simson's home on Ellicott Creek Road. The present church was built in 1880 
on land donated by Col. John Sweeney where the first schoolhouse in North Tonawanda was built. 

North Presbyterian Church: The church is located at 168 Payne Avenue and was organized in 1891. It was 
originally located at 195 Schenck Street with 74 parishioners. Its current building was dedicated on January 
31, 1899. 



Third Presbyterian Church: The church is located at 110 Felton Street and was organized on April 2, 1907. 
It began as the first English-speaking Sunday School in the Gratwick section of the City. 

Saint Albert the Great Roman Catholic Church: The church is located at Niagara Falls Blvd and Melody 
Lane and was established in 1960. The first Mass was held in the Melody Fair tent and the current church 
was dedicated on June 4, 1967. 

Ascension Roman Catholic Church: The church is located at 168 Robinson Street, was organized in April 
1887 and held its first Mass at 20 Webster Street. The original wooden church on Robinson was destroyed 
in a disastrous fire. The current church, built of brick but identical to the wooden one, was dedicated on 
December 16, 1894. 

Saint Joseph's Roman Catholic Church: The church is located at 1451 Payne Avenue and was organized 
in June 1947. The first Mass was held in a building at Warner Avenue and Witmer Road. The parish is 
celebrating its 50th Anniversary in 1997. 

Our Lady of Czestochowa Roman Catholic Church: The church is located at 64 Center Avenue and was 
organized in 1903 by Polish immigrants who had arrived here as early as 1880. 

Saint Peter's United Church of Christ: The church is located at 1208 Oliver Street and was organized on 
April 10, 1888. 

Community Christian Church: The church is located at 75 Seventeenth Avenue and was incorporated on 
October 22, 1981. It was founded as an independent Full Gospel church. 

The Fair Havens Church: The church is located at 195 Schenck Street. It was founded in 1978 and 
incorporated in 1981. A new house of worship is being constructed at 7337 Ward Road, to be completed 
by early summer of 1997. 




First United Methodist Church, c. 1926 



The church was built in 1880 at Main and Tremont Streets on land donated by Colonel 
John Sweeney. Col. Sweeney donated additional land in the same area which was used 
to build the first schoolhouse in the community. 



X 





CITY OF NORTH TONAWANDA 

m7 





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Charles - 

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Carmela - 

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Graduate following hip replacement 

Samantha - 

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Well-Child Care 



Beth - 

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Glen - 

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Sarah - 

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Not pictured: Grandma Ruth - DeGraff Adult Day Care Client, Grandpa John - Skilled Nursing Facility Resident 

Ti he DeQraff family is here for your family 




DeGraff 
m Memorial 
■ Hospital 



445 Tremont Street 

North Tonawanda, New York 14120-0750 



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North Tonawanda 

on your first 100 years 

General Motors Powertrain Group 

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"School is a building 

that has four Malls 
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tlorth Tonawanda City School district 

189 7 - 199? 






Many of our North Tonawanda residents 
have fond memories . . . 




Mary, with husband and resident, John Toman 



Northgate Manor Health Care Facility 

7264 Nash Road 
North Tonawanda, NY 14120 

694-7700 



THEcyWCGUIRE GROUP 

HEALTH CARE FACILITIES 



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years, North Tonawanda’ s “small town” atmosphere 
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John served in the Army for 34 years and also worked in a 
local paper mill Together, he and Mary raised two lovely 
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Stop by or call your nearest Marine Midland branch today. 



107 Main Street 
NorthTonawanda, NY 
693-8350 



1035 Payne Avenue 
North Tonawanda, NY 
693-7333 



<z> 

Marine Midland Bank 

Banking for the real world.® 



rFS3 ©1997 Marine Midland Bank Member FDIC 



Member HSBC Group 



AMERICAN LEGION 
SIKORA POST 

950 Payne Avenue 
North Tonawanda, NY 
14120 

716-693-1740 




Pat F orsha 

TRUCK AND AUTO COLLISION INC. 



2716 KEN MORE A VENUE 
TONAWANDA, N.Y. 14150 
FAX (716) 874-0023 



PATRICK M. FORSHA 

President 

(716) 874-7582 




Buffalopumps 



874 Oliver street 
North Tonawanda, NY 
14120-3298 
716-693-1850 




THRUWAY FASTENERS 



OUR ONLY BUSINESS IS TO SERVE YOU! 

• STOCK LESS PURCHASING - SYSTEMS CONTRACTS 

• NO ORDER IS TOO SMALL OR LARGE 




NUTS • SCREWS 
BOLTS ^ 



ALL METALS 




FAST DELIVERY — QUALITY PRODUCTS — FAIR PRICES 

WE STOCK MORE THAN 
40,000 ITEMS AT OUR 
FIVE LOCATIONS 

• NO SHORTAGES. WE COORDINATE 
A FIVE LOCATION INVENTORY 

• LET US CARRY YOUR INVENTORY 

WE SPECIALIZE IN MAINTENANCE AS WELL AS PRODUCTION PARTS FASTENERS 



1ENERS 





Proud to share in a history 
of excellence. 

Congratulations to the City of North Tonawanda 
on its Centennial Celebration. 



EXOLON-ESK 

EXOLON-ESK COMPANY 

1000 E. Niagara Street • P.O. Box 590 

Tonawanda, NY 14151-0590 

Tel: (NY) (716) 693-4550 • FAX (716) 693-0151 



E.G. Smith Investment Services 

Be Careful Who Handles Your Money 




• Mutual Funds 

• Stocks & Bonds 

• Retirement • IRA • 401(K) 
•Annuities 



Life & Disability Plans 
Estate & Tax Planning 



Gail Smith, an experienced 
professional skilled in financial 
Investment and protection needs. 
Registered Branch Office Ot Cade ret, Grant & Co.. 
Inc. - Member NASD/SIPC 




FREE CONSULTATION 
694-8114 

156 Delaware St. • Tonawanda, N.Y 14150 




Joseph A. Sciandra 

Podiatrist • Foot Surgeon FREE 



TOTAL FOOT CARE 



• Bunions 

• Heel Spurs 

• Hammertoes 

• Nail Problems 



► Flat Feet 
•Warts 
• Infections 



initial 

Consultation 

x-rays & treatment 
not included 



BUFFALO 

1275 Hertel Ave. 

875-3313 



NORTH TONAWANDA 

307 Schenck St. 

6944720 



Endoscopic 
Heel Spur Surgery 



Saturday & Evening Hours 
Most Insurances 
Accepted For 
Covered Services 







MW* 



OCCUPATIONAL 
HEALTH SERVICES 

OF WESTERN NEW YORK INC. 



Oksana W. Gregor 
Marketing Representative 



Occupational Health Services of Western New York, Inc. 

Complete Occupational Health Services 

• ASBESTOS, CHEMICAL AND HAZARDOUS WASTE EXAMS 

• DOT EXAMS 

• DRUG AND BREATH ALCOHOL TESTING 

• PREPLACEMENT EXAMINATIONS 

• RETURN TO WORK EVALUATIONS Fax (716) 692-7091 

• RESPIRATOR FIT AND CLEARANCE EXAMS 

51 Webster Street, N. Tonawanda, New York 14120 

All medical activities are under the direction of: 

JERMOME J. MAURIZI, M.D. Patricia A. Klinger 

Manager, Health Services 



(716) 692-6541 






ALEXANDER'S LOUNGE 

Feel the heat of Western New York's 
hottest night club. 




y- 










(7/6)692-6909 
46 SWEENEY ST. 
N. TON A WANDA 



MAJOR CREDIT 
CARDS ACCEPTED 
ATM AVAILABLE 




894-7350 

Custom Imprinted 
Promotional Products 

* 

Business Gifts 
Pencils • Calendars • Pens 
Hats • Keychains 
Steins • Mugs 
Novelty Items 
Thousands of Products 

Over 50 Years of Dedicated Service to WNY 

1692 Rule Hoad • North Tonawanda, NY 14120 



Private Practice: 
100 Webster St., 
North Tonawanda 
(716) 695-9110 



CONGRATULATIONS NORTH TONAWANDA 
ON VOUR 100th BIRTHDAY! 

"A Great Place to Live and Work" 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

NORTH TONAWANDA CITY ATTORNEY 
Jeffrey Mis, wife Diane 

sons Ryan & Corey City Attorney's Office: 

City Hall, 216 Payne Ave. 
North Tonawanda, N.Y. 
(716) 695-8590 





BUDWEY'S 

Serving the People 
of 

North Tonawanda 
for 

Over 68 Years! 

Supermarkets 

Laundromat / Dry Cleaners 
Commercial Real Estate 



ANNOUNCING 
FOR THE 



M & T Mainstage: 

MOON OVER BUFFALO • by Ken Ludwig 
Author of LEND ME A TENOR 

GREETINGS • by Tom Dudzick 
Author of OVER THE TAVERN 

SYLVIA • by A. R. Gurney 

HAVING OUR SAY* The Delany Sisters’ First 100 Years 
by Emily Mann 

CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF • by Tennessee Williams 

WAIT UNTIL DARK • by Frederick Knott 
Author of DIAL "M FOR MURDER 

A musical to be announced. 



And for our inaugural "Studio, Too!" Series: 

ANGELS IN AMERICA 

Port I : Millennium Approaches • by Tony Kushner 
SKYLIGHT • by David Hare 



All titles are subject to change 






(M) MOTOROLA 

Authorized Two-Way 
Radio Dealer 

KENILWORTH ELECTRONICS CO. 
Rcidiuy Dealer - CCTV 

Local & Wide Area Paging 



ROBERT W. SCHOBER 
(716) 837-6666 




(Mj MOTOROLA 

CommuntcaUoru 




860 Niagara Falls Blvd. 
Buffalo, NY 14223 
FAX (716) 837-6697 








1 




1 




1 



TRADE MARK 
tfie. oxlcjlnaC ±lnee. 1Q2) 

OVERHEAD DOOR CO OF N. TONAWAN DA 

DIVISION OF RIDGE OVERHEAD DOOR INC. 

SALES • REPAIRS • SERVICE • GARAGE DOOR OPENERS 



rasa 



"GARAGE DOOR REPLACEMENT OUR SPECIALTY" 

SECTIONA L ♦ ROLLING » FIRE DOORS • Insulated Doors 

free V9!nfsfsnni 

estima tes m OLIVER N. TONAWANDA 





"^^mcSfsKmART 




Exotic Piercing $ Tattooing 

ED 'WALKER 

16 Webster Street, N. Tonawanda, N.Y. 14-120 
(716) 694-9165 / fax: (716)62*4-9165 '51 



THE 

FISH 

PLACE 

WNVs Leading Tropical 
Fish Store 



Beautify Your Yard With A 
GARDEN POND! 

Full Line of POND FISH, 
PLANTS and SUPPLIES 




• Over 300 sparkling clean tanks. 

• Great selection of healthy marine 

fish and invertebrates. 

• Large selection of new aquariums at 

unbeatable prices. 

• Knowledgeable and friendly staff 

here to help with any questions. 

141 Robinson St. («■• oiiv«), N. Tonawanda 

693-4411 

10% Discount to NFPKC Members 
Mon-Fri 12 to 9, Sat 10 to 6, Sun 11 to 5 





u ) ^€$2388$$ j~) 




PARKSIDE 

FAMILY FUN 


XrOBO MARTI 




CENTER 


/ GAS CAR WASH V 




BOWLING 


\ ) 




COSMIC BOWLING 


LOW PRICES ON YOUR MILK & BREAD 




LASER-RUNNER LASER TAG 


ALONG WITH YOUR OTHER GROCERY NEEDS 




MINITURE GOLF 


MONTHLY BEER & POP SPECIALS 




BIRTHDAY AND PRIVATE PARTIES 


GET A FREE CAR WASH TOKEN 




OUR SPECIALTY 


FOR EVERY 8 GALLONS OF GAS 






WE HAVE COLD CASE BEER 




500 SCHENCK ST. 


ATM PLAY LOTTO 




NORTH TONAWANDA, NY 


INSIDE HERE 




693-2400 












nwnb 

m Bt“4e3>suis’Sff&!iA.iL 


Oliver street cafe 




i 

□ Mechanical Installations 

□ Millwrighting 


NORTH TONAWANDA • NEW YORK 




Weddings • Banquets • Picnics • Parties 




□ Rigging 

□ Fabrication 






□ Material Handling 


Catering 




jack A. Hohl 


at Soos' Oliver Street Cafe 




President 


At your place or ours, excellent food 
and service with a personal touch. 




95 Stark Street, 
Tonawanda, 


When you are ready for us. 




New Yorkl 4150-1 290 


we will be ready for you 




Phone: 


We serve no customer 




(716) 692-7779 


before their time. 




Fax: 


Established 19S7 




(716) 692-7847 



State - Certified 




Woman Owned and Operated 



Structural Office Systems, Inc. 

Office Furniture — Interior Design 

MAD Data Products, Inc. 

Computer Supplies — Office Stationery 

NOW OPEN 8: 30aa TO 6:30p» 

MAROB Enterprises, Inc. 

Archival Storage — Magnetic Media 
& Paper Documents 

Mary Ann Daugherty 




4 Webster Street 
North Tonawanda, N.Y. 14120 

716 - 694-0044 

FAX 716-694-3230 




ThistYour Eyes To Turtle 



• one of the largest selections of fashionable frames 
in upstate New York 

• contact lens specialists 

• fast and accurate prescriptions 

• lenses and frames replaced and repaired 

• all major credit cards accepted 

• major insurance plans 

• eye examinations 

We feature all the newest technology in eye caret 
EYE EXAMINATIONS AT ALL LOCATIONS 
EVENING & SATURDAY HOURS AT ALL LOCATIONS 



N. TONAWANDA 


KENMORE 


444 Payne Ave. 


3718 Delaware Ave. 


693-1280 


874-2345 


AMHERST 


LANCASTER 


Transit-Casey Plaza 


5430 Broadway 


9346 Transit Road 


(Near Central) 


688-3944 


685-4050 










THE DRUG SHOPPE IS 
PROUD TO BE PART 
OF THE 

NORTH TON A WANDA 
COMMUNITY AND 
CELEBRATE OUR 
100th ANNIVERSARY 



J 



KEN WENDT’S PROPANE GAS 

Owners: Ken - Dianne - Paul - Todd 

(716) 731-9826 5910 WARD ROAD 

(716) 731-3015 SANBORN, NY 14132 




Congratulations on your 
100 year Anniversary 

Thanks for all your support! 

International Filler Corporation 




ITT Industries 

AUTOMOTIVE 
DEFENSE & ELECTRONICS 
FLUID TECHNOLOGY 



ITT Automotive, Inc. 

Aftermarket 
435 Creekside Drive 
Amherst NY 14228 
Tel: (716) 691-3021, 

Fax: (716) 691-6021 



Adelphia 

i 

Your link. For everything. 



WE WORK FOR YOU! 

1921 - 1997 

76 

YEARS OF 
EXCELLENCE 

Geo. J. Essenburg & Son Inc. 

COMPLETE INSURANCE SERVICE 

692-2676 

3052 Niagara Falla Blvd., N. Tonawanda, NY 14120 



City of North Tonawanda 
Good Lack on yoar 100th Birthday! 

LEN WUDYKA 

2ND WARD COUNCILMAN 

EAST AVE. TAVERN 
881 Oliver 8t. * 692-2479 
WUDYKA FAMILY 



As we celebrate our city’s centennial, 
do your part to make 
our community beautiful. 




Teeth are intended to last 100 years, too. 
Paula C. Flynn, D.D.S., M.S. 
Wurlltzer Common, Suite 206 
1333 St rad Avenue 
North Tonawanda, NY 14120 
694-6935 



Wm 

PFAFF 

Quilt Cottage 

34 7 Somerville Ave. 
Tonawanda, NY 14150 
716-837-1372 



Introducing the fantastic 
new Ptaff creative 5 7570 




It’s here! The world’s 
finest computerized 
sewing machine along 1 1 1 
with the most advanced 
embroidery hoop 
system anywhere. There’s 
no faster or easier way to turn out 
gorgeous embroidery. 

The German-built 7570 also offers 
500 built-in stitch designs, handy 
step-by-step display screen, the works. 
Hurry in for a free demonstration today. 



REPAIR RENTALS 




- Brass & Woodwinds Our Specialty - 
2880 Niagara Falls Blvd. 

N. Tonawanda, NY 14120 716-693-5456 



T-NT BUS SERVICE INC. 

r- ' : 

X. NORMAN R. KIRISITS 

wi m President _ 



300 Spencer Street 
Syracuse, NY 13204 
(315) 448-1820 
FAX: (315)448-1368 



761 Walck Rd. 

N. Tonawanda, NY 14120 
(716) 695-7898 
FAX; (716) 695-8498 







PACKET CENTRE 

84 SWEENEY STREET 
NORTH TONAWANDA, NY 14120 



(716) 693-1919 
FAX (716) 693-6711 



Studio Apartments 
Commercial Space 




ANDY'S TREE SERVICE 




"Proper Surgery 

...before chemicals " 



• Fine Pruning 

• Tree Trimming 

• Tree Removal 

• Stump Removal 

• Seasoned Firewood 

• Emergency Service 

Satisfaction 

Guaranteed! 



771 HARDING AVE. N. TON. 



TELEPHONE 833-9060 OFFICE HOURS 

BY APPOINTMENT 






PETER J. FREYBURGER, D.V.M. 

PHILIP A. WEBER, JR., D.V.M. 903 BRIGHTON ROAD 

AND ASSOCIATES TONAWANDA, N.Y. 14150 



716 694-1111 






Fax 692-0959 



TRINITY TOOLS, INC, 



261 Main St. 

North Tonawanda, N.Y. 14120 




“SPECIALISTS IN 
COMMUNICATIONS 
EQUIPMENT” 



1914 COLVIN BLVD., TONAWANDA, NY 14150 



PHONE TOLL-FREE FAX 

(716) 832-2026 1-800-962-7370 (716) 832-7930 



NATURAL VITAMINS, MINERALS, SUPPLEMENTS 

BEST OF HEALTH 

Marcia Honsberger, 

R.N., B.S., C.N.C. 



2840 Delaware Avenue 
Kenrnore, NY 14217 
874-6422 





Mon. ft Sat. 10-5:30 
Tum. live Frl. 

10 tW 3 p.m. 



HEALTH RELATED 
SERVICES 

* Therapeutic Massages 

* Reflexology 

* Iridology 

* Nutritional Consulting 
By appointment only 



Improve Your Appearance 

In office procedures for removal of moles, 
skin tagB, "liver" and age spots. 

Treatment for spider veins of the face and legs, 
wrinkles and sundamaged sldn. 

Facial peels. 

Lynn A. Amarante, MJ)., P.C. 

DERMATOLOGY 

5144 Sheridan Drive 53 Mead Street 

Williamsville * 632-2311 N. Tonawanda * 695-5797 



BFTHKSDA FI ILL GOSPEL TABERNACLE 

Delaware and Broad Sts., Tonawanda, New York 
(716)-693-6990 

REV. SALVATORE CIFFA, SENIOR PASTOR 
Rev. Anthony Renda, Asst. Pastor 
Rev. Kevin Cole, Youth Pastor 
SCHEDULE OF SERVICES 

SUNDAY ! Adnlt Sunday School 9:30 am 

Morning Worship 10:30 am 

Children’s Sunday School 

MONDAY : “Monday Madness” 7:00 pm 

at Armory (Jr. And Sr. High only) 
WEDNESDAY : Senior Luncheon and Bible 

Study 11:30 am 

FRIDAY : Worship Service 7:00 pm 

Youth Activities 7:00 pm 

“All Ages 

MONTHLY ACTIVTIES : 

‘Single Parents Ministry 
‘Women’s Fellowship Group 
* Men’s Promise Keeper’s Group 
“Nursery Provided at all services 

SCHOOL : TONAWANDA CHRISTIAN 
ACADEMY 

PRE- K THROUGH 3 rd GRADE PROVIDED 

"A Church In The Heart Of The City 
With A Heart For You " 



HONORABLE ROBERT E. NICELY 
CITY COURT JUDGE 



HAPPY CENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY 

NORTH TONAWANDA 



FORD - LINCOLN MERCURY 



6980 NIAGARA FALLS BLVD. 
NIAGARA FALLS 
283-7691 



<50 



NT 

Centennial 
Birthday 
Party & Dance 



Thursday , April 24, 1997 



High School 
Auditorium 




NORTH TONAWANDA 



FREE ESTIMATES 694-3954 

HOWARD'S 

ADDITIONS 

BATHROOMS 

KITCHENS 



FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED FOR 25 YEARS 
INSURED SNOW PLOWING 



Congratulations 
North Tonawanda on too year Anniversary 



C0LUCCI FUNERAL HOME 

OUR 20th YEAR Of SERVING THE COMMUNITY 

1977-1997 

Michael 1 Colucci, lx. 



d 




NORTH TONAWANDA 4 CROWN AGENCY, INC. 
WORKING TOGETHER FOR 100 YEARS!!! 




CROWN AGENCY INSURANCE 



31 Webster Street 

North Tonawanda, New York 14120 
(716)692-5252 



All Forms of Insurance Since 1890 
Auto • Life • Homeowners 
Business • Marine • Bonds 



Best Wishes 

From 




MERICAN 

LLSAFECO. 



99 Wales Avenue 
Tonawanda, New York 14150 
(716) 695-8300 



Manufacturer and Distributor of Personal Protective Equipment 







MID-CITY DENTISTRY 



SENIOR CITIZENS DISCOUNT 



978 Payne Avenue • N. Tonawanda, NY 14120 
(716) 694-3040 




693-2700 

AMERICA'S CHOICE FOR GROUP TOURS AND CHARTERS 
TO ANYWHERE IN THE USA AND CANADA 

WE DO MORE THAN JUST GET YOU THERE! 



BUFFALO 
ABRASIVES, INC. 



National Industrial Park 

960 Erie Ave. • N. Tonawanda. NY 14120 

716/693-3856 FAX 716/693-4092 




First United Methodist Church 
65 Main St. at Tremont 
North Tonawanda 
694-2456 

Pastor-Rev. Thomas F. Wickett 
Associate Pastor-Rev. Everett F. Spring 

g nu&n&i. I 

Sunday Worship - 10:45 a.m. 

Sunday School for all ages - 9:20 a.m. 
Summer Worship - 10:00 a.m. 

Nursery Care Provided - Barrier Free Sanctuary - Ampie Parking 





SIGNS 

Vinyl Graphics 
Banners* Vehicle Lettering 
Magnetics* Window Lettering 



AWNINGS 

Patios • Windows 
Decks ‘Retraotables 
Entrance Canopies 
Illuminated Awning Signs 



SPECIALIZING 

In Quality Residential / Commercial Awnings & Signs 



"Give Us A Try Before You Buy!" 



6M«wRd 
N. Tonawanda, NY I 



FAX 693-3767 




FOOD & DRINK 

Oft t/te ./ittfv f/ime/* 

North Tonawanda • Now York 



BEODSeS 

SERVING THE TCNAWANDAS 

MOBIL 694-8010 TRUCKING 

CORNER OF DIVISION AND ROBINSON 

OPEN 24 HRS / 7 DAYS A WEEK 



99C CAR WASH 



DUMP T RUCK 



WITH 8 GAL FILL UP 

CLP COUPON 



SERVICE & 

SNOW REMOVAL 



Ward Wattengel 

ProiJcnt 




Funeral Howe , Inc. 

307 Oliver Street • North Tonawanda, New York 14120 
(716)692-0440 







CONGRATULATIONS 

NORTH TONAWANDA ON YOUR CENTENNIAL 

JAMES AMATO & COMPANY P.C. 

CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 
SERVING THE TONAWANDAS SINCE 1959 

36 NORTH NIAGARA STREET 
TONAWANDA, NEW YORK 14150 
694-0336 FAX 694-5081 



THE WA Y TO GO TOURS 

God is the source of All Blessings 
received the past 100 years! 

May we who call ourselves Christian 
continue to Thank Him for His Love! 

Jerry & Helen Waldkoetter 693-0793 



William C. Rod & Son - since I 909 



Quality Materials - Professionally Installed 

694-8220 




INDUSTRIAL 
rV DESIGN INC. 

644 Oliver St., North Tonawanda, NY 14120 

DESIGN * CAD DRAFTING SERVICES 

20 Years ot Providing High Ouallty. Cost Effective Design CAD Services 
Utilizing the Same Skilled Personnel at Your Facility or Our Office 

* Process Plant Design 

* Mechanical/Machine Design 

* Electrlcal/CMI/Structural 

* Turnkey Deslgn/Bulld 

* AutoCAD /MlcroStatlon Specialists 

TEL: 694-9809 FAX: 694-6182 



atj 



flowers 

bydlane 



Floral arrangements for all Occasions 

To everything there is o season 7293 Schu | t2 Road 

North Tonawanda, New York 14120 
(716) 693-9637 • (800) 201-1215 



send flowers 



252 Fillmore Avenue 
Tonawanda, NY 14150 
716*694*1100 
Fax 716*694*1188 

SAFEWAY 

Platform Systems, Inc. 

o ' Multi-Span 

frkiWH Bridge Decking 




WITH THANKS AND APPRECIATION 






TO THOSE THAT CAME BEFORE US 




PC MOMS CROSSROADS 


AND BEST WISHES TO THOSE 




488 Oil ¥6 ft 


THAT FROM THIS POINT ON 




696~8442 


ARE CALLED UPON TO DEVELOP 






OUR NEXT 100 YEARS! 

tiflHfflj St. mar v manufacturing carp. 




Tues - All you can eat Spaghetti 12-7 
Wed. - Wing 1 Day 
Fri. • Fish Fry 12 - 9 


1254 ERIE AVENUE 

NORTH TONAWANDA, NEW YORK 1 4 1 20-3036 











Lumber City 
Rock Gym 



1333 Strad Avenue 
Niagara Falls Blvd. & Erie Ave. 
N. Tonawanda, NY 14120 
695-1248 



il 



iiii 



THE 

HOLLER-UNITED 



172 Main Street 
Tonawanda, NY 14150 
716-694-7000 



AGENCY 

INSURANCE 
SINCE 1931 



Jon H. Holler 

Jonathan W. Grapes, CPCU 



YELLOW FREIGHT SYSTEM 

66 MILENS ROAD 
TONAWANDA, NEW YORK 14150 
(716) 879-3400. FAX (7 1 6) 879-3415 



BECAUSE IT’S NOT 
BUSINESS AS USUAL© 











RACING INC. 



TEL. (716) 731-5557 
FAX. (716) 731-6662 



2221 NIAGARA FALLS BLVD., 
NIAGARA FALLS, NY 
14304-0251 




Phone: (716) 692-5426 

hock's 

flower shop inc. 

700 East Robinson Street 
North Tonawanda, New York 14120 



Wayne Perkins 
Faye Perkins 



^OOVSUMDSC Ap t ^ c 

Your Complete Service 

Designing & Planting General Maintenance 

All Trimming Retaining Walls 

Sodo,Se8d BRIAN MARTIN 

694-5889 




Phono: (716)692-1144 



J AX-SMITH, Inc. 



•BUILDING-REPAIRS 



Steeple Jack Work e Sand Blasting e Caulking 
Staam Cleaning a Water Proofing a Pointing a Restoration 



180 Sweeney Street 

North Tonawanda, N.Y. 14120 



David E. Smith 
Secretary 



© 



DOLORES J. WAWRZYMEK, P.D.S. 

ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY 



Saber Funeral Home 

549 OLIVER STREET 
NORTH TONAWANDA, NY 14120 



OFFICE HOURS 
BY APPOINTMENT 



475 PAYNE AVENUE 

N. TONAWANDA, N.Y 14120 

(716)695-4984 



JOSEPH P. SABER 
LICENSED DIRECTOR 



(716) 692-D271 



MARK G. CAPUTI 

Insurance Agency 

3900 Niagara Falls Boulevard, N. Tonawanda, NY 14120 
Office: 694-7731 Claims: 1-800-421-3535 

NATIONWIDE 
INSURANCE 

Nationwide is on your side 




GALASSFS 



your hosts 
LARRY & GAIL 



452 PAYNE AVE. 

NORTH TONAWANDA N.Y. 
694-5858 



SHOP 




HOME OF THE 
NITE-MARE 
WE DELIVER 




PHONE: 693-0204 



BROWNIE’S 

Auto Care Center 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE REPAIRS 



tail 



716-743-1444 



WAYNE C. BROWN 
Owner 



1066 PAYNE AVENUE 
N. Tonawanda, NY 14120 



[eritage Pipe Organs, Inc. 



908 Niagara Falls Boulevard 
North Tonawanda, New York 14120 



PERRY & LOGAN 



James M. Perry 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 




COMMTECH 

Infor ma tion Systems Inc. 



/ 



COMMTECH 

ISP, Inc. 



248 MEADOW DRIVE 
NORTH TONAWANDA. NEW YORK 14120 



OFFICE: (716) 743-0044 
FAX (7161 743-1644 
RES. (716) 695-2594 



Design end Integration o( Internet / Intranet 
and LAN/WAN systems. 

649 Walck Road 

North Tonawanda, NY 14120-3431 

PHONE: 716-695-2615 

FAX: 716-695-2618 

e-mail: mpalmerecommtech.net 



Michael R. Palmer, RCDD 

President 








For All Your Custom Embroidery and Screen Printing Needs 

Team Uniforms * Jackets * Hats * Ts & Sweats 
Groups * Organizations * Business * Individual Orders 

Designer Sportswear 

80 Webster St. N. Tonawanda, NY 14120 716-695-3369 

Mention tins ad and receive 5% off our everyday low prices on your next order * 
♦Not applicable to prior sales or set up charges. Limit one order per customer. 
Expires 12/31/97 



*\ APV 



APV Heat Transfer Technologies 

395 Fillmore Avenue 
Tonawanda. NY 14150 
Tel: 716-692-3000 
Fax: 716-692-1715 




(716) 692-6019 





TRUCK AND REPAIR CO. 

ALIGNMENT SPECIALISTS 
MECHANICAL / TRAILER SERVICE 

222 Ironton Street 
No. Tonawanda, NY 141 20 



SUPER SPORTS 

AUTOMOTIVE & RECREATIONAL 

CARS • BOATS • MOTORCYCLES 
COLLISION • GLASS • DETAILING 
217 OLIVER STREET PETE KIRISITS 

N. TON., N.Y. 14120 (716)693-8447 



H. WILLIAM SIPPEL, D.D.S., 

PETER K. DOYLE, D.D.S., 

THOMAS J. MURRAY, D.D.S., AND 
GLEN C. DONNARUMMA, D.D.S., PC. 

ORAL AND MAXILLO-FACIAL SURGERY 
555 DELAWARE STREET 
TONAWANDA. NEW YORK 14150 
694-1134 

5136 SHERIDAN DRIVE 200 BEWLEY BUILDING 

WILLI AMSVILLE, NEW YORK 14221 LOCKPORT, NEW YORK 14094 

631-5551 433-3822 




AMERICAN 

CUSTOM 



METAL FABRICATING CO. 

28 COTTAGE ST. N. TONAWANDA, NY. 14120 
Family owned & operated 
716-695-2535 since 1987 GENE BEAMER 



ERIE COUNTY OFFICE 
2858 DELAWARE AVE. 
KENMORE N.Y. 14217 
(716) 875-1406 



NIAGARA COUNTY OFFICE: 

84 SWEENEY STREET 
N TONAWANDA. N.Y. 14120 
BY APPOINTMENT 





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if 



Norton / Radin / Hoover / Freedman 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 



HEIN SALES & DISTRIBUTING CO. 

LICENSED GAME OF CHANCE 
CARNIVAL & BINGO SUPPLIES 
BELL JAR TICKETS 



FREDERICK W. BECK 
Owner 



1 08 1 2th Ave. 
N. Tonawanda, NY 14120 




692-7901 



1 26 EAST NIAGARA ST. 
TONAWANDA NY 14150 
PHONE (716) 694-0715 
FAX (716) 694-7241 



TKaxjvUt ‘EtaAcUf* 5 

pAHct . Q 



1275 ERIE AVE., NO. TONAWANDA, N.Y. 14120 



N.T. OWNED 



N.T. OPERATED 



Law Offices 



fodieb S6oe& 

MEN'S & WOMEN'S QUALITY SHOES 

"Specialists in Wide & Extra Wide Widths' 

Mon. - Sat. 9:30 - 5 PM; Thurs. till 8 PM 
75 Webster St. (Riviera Theatre) Jim MacPhee 

North Tonawanda, NY 14120 693-0002 



Frederic C. 
Vincent R. 
Joseph L 
James A. 



Washburn 

Ginestre 

Arbour 

Rizzo 



Jeffrey N. Mis 

100 Webster Street 
North Tonawanda, NY 14120 



ELDRIDGE CLUB 

17 BROAD STREET 
TONA WANDA, N Y 14150 
693-3589 



FRONCZAK 

FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC 

354 GROVE STREET 
TONAWANDA, NY 14150 
693-2982 



SAM MARABELLA 
PHYSIC1AL THERAPY 

1088 KINKEAD 

NORTH TONAWANDA, NY 14120 
692-6388 



OFFICE HOURS BY APPOINTMENT PHONE 694-5444 

FAZILI - SHAFI PHYSICIAN ASSOCIATES 
MOHAMAD SHAFI, M.D. 

Internal Medicine & Nephrology 

M. YOUSUF FAZILI, M.D. F.A.C.S. 

General Surgery, Head & Neck Surgery 
53 Mead St North Tonawanda, NY 14120 




641 Erie Avenue 
P 0. Box 549 

N. Tonawanda, N Y. 14120 
716/693-7600 / Fax: 716/695-9082 
24 HR. EMERGENCY SERVICE- 716 / 774-2181 



Thank you for letting me be a part of 
your history. 

Serving you for the last 40 years. 

Dr, Tefc franzszck 

Optometrist 



COLLISION • TOWING & FLATBED SERVICE • GLASS 



DAN’S COLLISION 



GARDEI, Inc. 

525 WHEATFIELD ST. 
NORTH TONAWANDA, NY 14120 
731-4137 



191 OLIVER STREET 
No. Tonawanda, NY 14120 



DAN HABUDA 
694-9353 




SELF-CONFIDENCE ■ SELF-DEFENSE - TOTAL FFTNE 



SALES - REPAIR - COLLISION 
TOWING - INSPECTION 
-y*m* Ohm. SUp Ah/mm/mHbm Sksp" 




Owner*: 

Dave Dunch 
Sue Rynkowsld 
PQ BCU 607 - 



Phone 692-23SO 
Fa* 692-263 
Collision: 694-9033 
I MAIN ST - NQTONAWANOA. NY 1420 



Receive $5.00 OFF ANY PROGRAM 
695-3552 Call NOW Classes Limited 

**3555 

Plus FREE TSHIRT with this AD - Offer Expires 9 /3»/97 
JONG PARK TAE KW0N-D0 1321 ERIE AVE., NO TONAWANDA 
Serving N. Tonawanda for over 25 Years 



The Coin Laundry 

on Bh 

Raintree Island U 

Clean- Safe-Convenient 

16 Washers 2 Heavy Duty Washers 

1 1 Dryers Change Machine 

Car Vac Soap/Softener Mach. 

Soft Drinks Laundry Bags 

Open 7 Days 6:00am-9:00pm 
Coffee on Weekends 2974 Colvin 



Action Food Service 

Vending & Coffee Service 

653 Erie Avenue 

N. Tonawanda, New York 14120-4404 
(716) 695-3082 
FAX (716) 695-0129 




MIKE'S 

CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING 
716 - 694-9621 



DEODORIZING UPHOLSTERY CLEANING 

DUPONT TEFLON STAIN GUARD COMMERCIAL RATES 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



Mike Rosky 



f-fmUjcpndifc 



Crafts • Gifts • Antiques 
Coffee • Teas • Sweets 



Horns: 

Mon-Sat 10 am-5 pm 
Thursday 10 a.m.-7p.ra. 



510 Oliver Street 
No. Tbn., NY 14120 

716-694-4715 



Owners: Kay Learned and Penny Creasey 



ba I z e rs 



The U.S. Headquarters of the World Leader 
in thin film coating technology wishes 
North Tonawanda all the best 
as they celebrate their 100 year anniversary. 
Balzers Tool Coating Inc. 

661 Erie Avenue - North Tonawanda. NY 14120 
Phone (716) 693-8557 - Fax (716) 695-1995 



£ 


* 








<§, 



Jodi Gademsky 
Director/Owner 



CHILD’S CREATIVE DEVELOPMENT CENTER INC. 
Complete Child Care 



693-0234 



1 38 Delaware St 
Tonawanda, NY 



Varsoris Drytvall 



1504 Brookfield 
JV. Tonawanda 



693-OZ18 



CU0VS1L PftBX &P&BTM1RTS 

100 OLIVER STREET 
NORTH TONAWANDA 
693-5536 



Congratulations 

from 

Lou's Restaurant 

73 Webster St* N. Tonawanda 694-6025 
Mon-Sat 7-7 Sun 7-2 



JOHN’S FLAMING HEARTH 

1965 Military Read 
Niagara Falls 
297-1414 



'me/fiff 



Materials Corp. 



COtCMTi - BLOCK 
SAMP-SBAKFL 
BBKBFBS CUPHiFS 



22 SS BA MV AVt. 

BUFFALO. MT 
f? I6/BB4-22SS 



ft) 

:kpc 



IDCKP QRT 

savings 



55 East At ’ emit- • P.O. Box 514 
Lockport, NY 14095-0514 



& & tax CONSULTING - ACCOUNTING 



nc. 



2 MAIN STREET 
TONAWANDA, NEW YORK 
(716) 692-8429 



STALE CCCE 

MUSIC PROD U.C T I O N S . INC 




Jim Kretz 

Sales Manager 



FRETTHOLD FUNERAL HOME INC. 

Dignified • Thoughtful • Personal Service 

Since 1948 

692-2610 



1241 OLIVER ST. 
NO, TONAWANDA. NY 




w 



"MARTY" 

HALL'S PLUMBING & HEATING 

308 Niagara Street 
NORTH TONAWANDA, NY 14120 

Phone 692-5323 



tv Ts©n' r ' 



(2o4H*KU*tittf, TKitetOKb 

1570 Buffalo Ave., Niagara Falls, New York 14303 

BEST WISHES 



„ _ . _ ( 716 ) 285-3413 

Senvuty 7 hc lUaqana, y%0M(u% fax # ( 716 ) 285-0616 



ACE TREE SERVICE 

Tree Trimming & Removal 
Professional Stump Grinding 
692-8159 Seasoned Firewood 875-2336 



TOM FEZER COLLISION INC. 



Collision Repairs 



tpLpperbajj's (dkrthierB and Woolens, lEtd. 

IQ' i~1 f|‘ 1 



THOMAS FEZER, Owner 
DAVE THOMSON, Mgr. 
(716) 693-6013 



625 Walck Road 
North Tonawanda 
N.Y. 14120 




Men's Suits • Sport Coats • Slacks 
Fabrics for the Tailor and Seamstress 

Rocco Naccarato - Master Tailor 
90 Webster Street Phone: (716) 695-1905 

North Tonawanda, NY 14120 The Fred Pepperday Family 



ELLEN & SAL 
CALANDRA 



272 1 HOMEYER RD 
N TONAWANDA. N.Y. 



Spring Kennels 



II 



Boarding ‘Trimming • Dogs • Cats 
Phone 692-6834 



ACACIA PARK - RESTHAVEN 
MEMORIAL GARDENS 

Administrative Office and Cemeteries 
4215 N Tonawanda Creek Road 
N Tonawanda. New York 



Family Service Counselor 



Office 692-0511 



MEYER 

Iandscaping, INC. 



Free Estimates 

landscape 

design & construction 



Certified WNY Nurseryman 



residential & commercial 

JON W. MEYER 
716-694-3137 



INNOVATIVE 
MECHANICAL 

CONTRACTORS, INC . 

Heating • Air Conditioning • Ventilation • Sheet Metal Fabrication 



1 46 Ironton Street 

No. Tonawanda, NY 14120 



Phone (716) 692-0608 
Fax (716)695-3403 




NEW location: 

3967 Niagara Falls Blvd. 

Ponds • Waterfalls 
Watergardens • Fountains 
Handmade Portable Fountains 
Water Plants Si Fish Avadable 

Keith Onofrio 

870-0208 

Insured 
Free Estimates 



Robert L. Weir 

(716) 693-7954 
Fax 693- 1 647 





162 Sweeney Street, P.O. Box 199 
North Tonawanda. New York 14120-0199 



Dowimiimg & Hall's 

(53 TOYOTA mazoa ® Jeep Eagle 

“Serving Western New York since 19BB" 




Serving The Community Since 1947 



6179 TRANSIT ROAD 
LOCKPORT. NEW YORK 14094 



(716) 625-8444 
Fax (716) 625-6B93 



The Braniecki Family 
282 Oliver Street . North Tonawanda, NY 14120 693‘3816 



ROWE 

BISONITE 

Rowe Products Distribution Co. 

470 Niagara Parkway 
North Tonawanda 
New York 14120-7009 
Tel: 716/693-6130 
Fax: 716/693-8244 





Congratulations on 100 years 
of Progressl 

The YWCA of Tonawandas Is 
proud to have been part of 

YWCA the fabric of this wonderful 
community for 84 years. 
YWCA of the Tonawandas 



Tonawandas 



49 Tremont St. North Tonawanda. 692-5580 





JOHNSTON'S 
MODERN UPHOLSTERY 
986 Oliver St. 

N. Tonawanda 
695-1475 


DENTON 

TRANSPORTATION 
ENTERPRISES Inc. 

P. O. Box 129 
875-6528 


JAECE 

INDUSTRIES INC. 

908 Niagara Falls Blvd 
N. Tonawanda 
694-2911 


PIZZA HUT 

3010 Niagara Falls Blvd. 
N. Tonawanda 
692-7771 

$3.00 off Large Pizza 
with this ad 


JIMMY’S 

CABINETS 

908 Niagara Falls Blvd. 
N. Tonawanda 
693-1014 


JANICE ADCOCK 
PIANO INSTRUCTION 
10 Brentwood Dr. 

N. Tonawanda 
692-0484 


J.P.'S DOWNTOWN 

84 Sweeney St. 

N. Tonawanda 
692-9670 


KISSEL 

COUNTRY INN 

825 River Rd. 

N. Tonawanda 
692-0052 


J L AUTOMOTIVE 

343 Ward Rd. 

North Tonawanda 
692-6770 


WALKER BROS. & 
MONROE JEWELERS 

84 Webster St. 

North Tonawanda 
693-0527 


LITTLE PEOPLE'S 
PARK 

82 Mead St. 

North Tonawanda 
694-7661 


SUBURBAN 
MACHINE Inc. 

299 Payne Ave. 

N. Tonawanda 
692-2221 


L.J. CRAIG, Inc. 

30 1 Meadow Dr. 
North Tonawanda 
695-6800 


EVIKA DESIGNS 

CREATIVE CUSTOM 
DESIGNERS OF FLORAL 
ARRANGEMENTS 

695-ROSY 


JOANN’S HEARTS 
& FLOWERS 

35 Payne Ave. 

N. Tonawanda 
695-2337 


COUNTRY COTTAGE 
RESTAURANT 

4072 Beach Ridge Rd. 
Pendleton 
693-4911 


WALGREENS 

10 Young St. 
Tonawanda 
692-1568 


ROEMAC 
INDUSTRIAL SALES 

27 Fredencka St. 

N. Tonawanda 
692-7332 


RUCKERS AUTO 
& TRUCK 

7506 Shawnee Rd. 
North Tonawanda 
695-7900 


BODY WORKS 
COLLISION & PAINT 
SPECIALISTS 
1039 Erie Ave., N T 
695-1660 


ACME GRINDING 
SERVICE, Inc. 

126 E Niagara St. 
Tonawanda 
694-6060 


LUMBERJACK 
PALLET, Inc. 

108 Sommer St. 

N. Tonawanda 
694-7211 


FOUR JOKERS 
MAGIC SHOP 

45 Mam St. 
Tonawanda 
693-7930 


DR. DALE E. 
VOELKER 

1050 Oliver St. 

North Tonawnada 

693-0600 



EDWARD ZEBULSKE III 
ATTORNEY AT LAW 
150 Payne Ave. 

N. Tonawanda 
694-6622 


WALLCRAFT 
DRYWALL, Inc. 
7330 Townline Rd 
N. Tonawanda 
692-1288 


LUIGI’S PIZZERIA 

615 Ward Rd. 
N.Tonawanda 
693-1904 


ADM 

AMERICAN DESIGN & 
MANUFACTURING 

200 River Rd. N. Tonawanda 

693-2501 


J.E.M. DESIGN 

3680 Delaware Ave. 


CREATIVE IMAGING 
GROUP 


SUBURBAN WOMENS 
HEALTH CARE 


AL'S 

FAMILY BILLIARDS 


Tonawanda 

693-1570 


190 Vandervoort St. 
North Tonawanda 
693-2912 


4080 Delaware Ave. 
Tonawanda 
876-5512 


305 Oliver St. 
North Tonawanda 
694-0860 


WHEATFIELD 


HAPPY ANNIVERSARY NT 


SKILL BUICK 


PIZZA JUNCTION 


ANIMAL HOSPITAL 


FAMILY & CARE 


363 Delaware Street 


1100 E. Robinson St. 


3421 Niagara Falls Blvd. 
N. Tonawanda 
693-3141 


SERVICE OF NIAGARA 

826 Chilton Ave. Niagara Falls 
285-6984 


Tonawanda 

692-4333 


North Tonawanda 


APPLESEEDS 


IULLIARD-CREASEY 


LISTON 


APPLE AUTO TOPS 


CREATIVE LEARNING CTR. 


FUNERAL HOME, Inc. 


MANUFACTURING 


& CAR UPHOLSTERY 


157 Main St. 


147 Delaware St. 


421 Payne Ave. 


1 1 Heath Terr. 


Tonawanda 


Tonawanda 


N. Tonawanda 


Buffalo 


692-ACLC 


692-2708 


695-2111 


835-7123 


L&S METALS 

111 Whitmer Rd 
NORTH TONAWANDA 
692-6865 


CERTIFIED 
CONSUMER SERVICE 

1040 Payne Ave 
N. TONAWANDA 
692-8880 


OLIVER AUTO 
REPAIR 

451 Oliver St. 

N. Tonawanda 
695-3011 


PRECISION TUNE 

889 East Robinson Rd. 
North Tonawanda 
694-3449 


PLASTERERS & CEMENT 


DUBY AUTO & 


EUGENE J. SMOLKA 


NESTOR'S 


MASONS LOCAL 1 1 1 OF 
ERIE & NIAGARA CTY. 


MARINE 

254 Sweeney St. 


ATTORNEY AT LAW 

683 Shad St. 


TEXAS RED HOTS & 
FAMILY RESTAURANT 


165 Division St, N.T. 
695-1494 


North Tonawanda 
694-0922 


N. Tonawanda 
694-5934 


102 Webster St. 
695-3596 



HOCKEY OUTLET 


KEN-TON 


GIBRALTAR 


BEST WISHES 


ICE COMPLEX 


ELECTRONICS Inc. 


INDUSTRIAL SVCS. 


FROM 


3385 Niagara Falls Blvd 


187 Green Acres Rd. 


92 Cooper Ave. 


Msgr. Thomas Crane & 


695-1055 


Tonawnada 


Tonawanda 


the Parishioners of 




837-9168 


875-1800 


St. Joseph's Catholic Church 


SHERWIN 


ARGO ELECTRIC 


LOCKTON WELDING 


CUTTIN CORNERS 


WILLIAMS 


45 Maplegrove Ave. 


& FABRICATING 


1248 Ruie Rd. 


301 Meadow St. N.T. 


Tonawanda 


453 Payne Ave., N. T. 


North Tonawanda 


692-0427 


834-8877 


692-0300 


694-1366 


THE HOUSE 


WHEATFIELD 


AVA'S PLACE 


CHEZ ELLE 


MECHANIC 


TRADING POST 


88 Webster St. 


BEAUTY SALON 


249 Cresthill Ave., Ton. 


7296 Schultz Rd., N. T. 


North Tonawanda 


84 Sweeney St.. N. T. 


835-7700 


692-0966 


693-8777 


692-9414 


ABOU DEW AN 


GUNTAS CLEANERS 


KINGS COURT 


NORTH SIDE 


& HANNA CO. 


1482 Payne Ave. 


HAIR STYLE 


FLORIST 


118 Killewald Ave., Ton. 


N. Tonawanda 


272 Oliver St., N.T. 


458 Oliver St., N.T. 


743-0388 


693-6181 


694-4371 


693-5356 


JOHNNY'S 








BIKE SHOP 








1246 Payne Ave., N.T. 








692-821 1 










ih 






=E 




FRIENDS OF 






NORTH TONAWANDA 






Best Wishes N.T. from: 

Assistant Fire Chief Paul STOLZENFELS 


Congratulations N.T. from: 

City Treasurer Leslie J. STOLZENFELS 






Mr & Mrs Thomas JAY & Family - 45 years 


Helen M. KOWALSKI 






In Memory of: 

Chester & Leona (SWIERCZYNSKI) MIS 


Straight Ahead to the Future! 
the URBANIAK & BRADY Families 






Frank & Bernice LAYCOCK 


Chester PAWELCZYK 






Tom & Ethel CROOP - 
Good Luck in the Next Century! 


Happy Birthday North Tonawanda! 
from: Matthew STOLZENFELS 






In Memory of: 

Mr & Mrs Elmer H. MARTIN 


In Memory of: 
Clarence WEYERS 






Edward KING 


MOSLOW Family 






Happy Centennial North Tonawanda! 


Cindy BLACK 






Paul & Viola WALKER 


Elizabeth LEBAR 






Happy Birthday N.T. - the KELLER Family 


Mr & Mrs Craig FRANK & Family 






Alvery & Ruth M. SPRAY 


Elaine FETZER 






Happy Birthday N.T. from the FISHER’S 


In Memory of: 

John TRAPASSO (J.T. Men's Shop) 






Robert & Nancy BOLIG 


Mary GRZEBINSKI 






Norman & Norma KOCH 


Steve, Carol PAWLIK & Family 






Barbara & Paul WESTCOTT 


Frederick GARDINER & Son William 






Congratulations N.T.! 
from Ruby & Louis SCHMEICHEL 


FAST SIGNS 






Mr & Mrs George BAIZE 


Charlie YODER 






Mr & Mrs James RESHKE 


Dick & Karen MOSKAL 






Joan EMBORSKY 


The Kevin CLARK Family 






Irving T. & Mary H. ABT 


The ZAEPFEL Family 






The GOLDINGER Family 


Jim & Jackie MORDICK 




k 






-P 



FRIENDS OF 

NORTH TONAWANDA 




Here's to the 21st Century 
THE ROBSONS 

Best Wishes & GOD'S Blessings 
Robert A. & Elaine M. WELLENCE 
and family 

Congratulations 
Dave & Kathy WEAFER 

Mr Tim MORIARTY 

Congratulations on the Centennial 
Celebration of North Tonawanda 
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas RIVERA 

Cindy L. OBERJOSH 
William & Elizabeth OBERJOSH 

The Paul C. STOLZENFELS family 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald J. GUGLIUZZA, Sr. 

David and Mary Ellen HENRY 

Mr. & Mrs. Orlando BARTOLOMEI 

Happy Birthday N.T. 

Mr. & Mrs. Sherwood ZEBULSKE & family 
MARGARET HALL 
Kermit & Mary Lou SCHOELLES 
Mr. & Mrs William FINGERLOW 
THE HIGBEE'S 

Leon, Vera, Debbie, Diane, Dora & Leon III 
Mr. George NERI 

Kevin, Mary Kay & Matthew MORGAN 
Thomas & Eunice DREIER 
The GUST families 



HAPPY 100TH!!! 

S. KOZAK & family 

Irene D. BARRETT 

A Friend of the City 

Janet H. LEE 
Lynda LEE 
Harold LEE 

Congratulations N. T. 

Al, Nancy & Lisa BULDUC 

Happy Birthday 
from the MORGAN FAMILY 
Bill, Annie, Jeff, Terri, & Katie 

Best Wishes 
Florian & Helen FRYS 

Happy Centennial N. T. 

Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence HAUSE 

THE TRUNZO FAMILY 

Congratulations on 100 years 
Jon & Marilyn Campbell 
In Memory of Tom & Helen MIS 
and Gordon and Irma CAMPBELL 

RON & KAY KAISER 

RON & SANDY BOWSER 

Happy Centennial 

Brian, Madeline, Justin & Katie JONES 

Happy Birthday North Tonawanda NY 
Ben & Dusty GLENN 

Grace WOKERSIEN 
Edward & Phyllis WOKERSIEN 
James & Clarissa WOKERSIEN 

Mrs. Hugh McLean 3rd 




FRIENDS OF 

NORTH TONAWANDA 



In Memory of Casey Johanna STOLT 
from Lewis & Martha VeROST 


Phyllis I. ROSS 
Richard & Olga BOPP 


Frank & Marilyn KILBURY 


Roberta (BUYER) EVERS 


Margaret WOTHERSPOON 


Mr & Mrs Fred & Gina TADDEI 


A Great Place to Live!! - Ruth & Allen 
ANDERSON 


Ted & Ella KRAFT - Happy 100th! 


The PAPIN Family 


Happy Birthday N.T. - N. HANSEN Family 


Dale & Vicki ROGERS 


In Memory of Elmer & Elsie WURL 
from Daughter Sandy 


The RANG & KREMPA Families 


In Honor of Elizabeth C. HOFFMAN (Betty) 


Mr & Mrs Robert E. KOHLES Family 


First Woman Council Member (1978-79) & First 
Woman to Serve as Mayor (1980-92) 


Francis R. & Shirley M. MOLNAR 


The ROGGE Family - Dave, Nancy & David II 


Mr & Mrs Charles H. PEACOCK 


Chief GRAVES, Delmar & Family 


Roy W. TOELLNER 


Jack & Patricia PENMAN 


Mr & Mrs Greg HILL 


Pat BRIER 


Laura & Jessica TAYLOR 


Mr & Mrs Tom McGANN 


Edna M. HARBER 


Patty & Steve TREMBLAY 


In Memory of John GALLAGHER 


Dolly SEVERINO 


Michael & Susan ZOBRIST 


David BURGIO 


Isaac W. & Patricia J. BRATTON 


Donna BURGIO 
Monica BURGIO 


Mr & Mrs Charles W. McCOLLUM 


John KROETSCH & Family 


Felix & Marjorie SIEZEGA 


Ronald McCREADY 


Jim & Jill McNEILL 


Lynda & Corky wish N.T. Congratulations 


Jeff, Sue, Liz, Tim & Andrea LICHT 


& Much Success in the Next 100 Years! 


WALGOATE Family 


Mr Robert W. RAE 




FRIENDS OF 





NORTH TONAWANDA 



Doug, Linda & Malanie MELLENTHINE 

Milton & Joan SCOTT 
Happy 100th Birthday 
North Tonawanda! 

In Memory 

Loving Wife & Mother 
Barbara A. SZYNKOWSKI 

William & Pat JOLBERT 
Bill, Renee & Cheryl 
North Tonawanda, NY 

Mabel W. HAESELER 
N. Tonawanda, NY 

Mr & Mrs David RAPP 
& 

Family 

In Memory of Frank G. LYONS 

John BORCZYNSKI 

Walter MacDONALD III 
& 

Family 

Congratulations N.T.! 

Ellyn ANDREES-BROEKER, Roger III & Lynelle 
Edward & Arlene ANDREES 

Here’s to the Next 100! 

The BRENZEL Family 
Karl, Mary & Kyle 

Mr. Richard WRAZIN 

Rev. & Mrs. Frank WRIGHT 

Happy 100th N.T. 

THE HILDEBRANDS 



Mr. & Mrs. Ellis McINNIS 
Deborah McINNIS 
Timothy McINNIS 

Happy Birthday, NT 
Norm, Lynn, Sarah, Katie ALEXANDER 

Happy 100th Birthday North Tonawanda 
Harold E. & Rose Mary MANTE 

JAKUBASZEK, David & Jean, 

Jennifer, Michael, Thomas & Joseph 

Mrs. Eugene FIEDYN 
Colleen M. FIEDYN 
Pauline E. FIEDYN 

Clair Vernon & Bessie Lee Foster; children 
Marcelle, Clair R. & Roberta. Roberta married 
John F. Sarvey; 

children John M., Bonnie & Betty 
John & Cornelia Sarvey - Lisa Benjamin & Thomas 
Bonnie & Darrell Bartkowski - Patrick Amy & 
Daniel 

Betty & Richard Salek - Angela Andrew & Michael 

Dorothy M. FRONCZAK daughter of 
Stanley & Frances (Nowatka) FRONCZAK 

James Hever 

Thomas Glass 

Adelaide Fire 

Dean Fisher 

Ray Horan 

Alex Cuningham 

Philip & Susan Lanoye 

Andrew & Kathleen Constantino 





JAKUBASZEK, Theodore & Helen (FRYS) 
David & Dennis 



FRIENDS OF 
NORTH TONAWANDA 



m 



£ 



Lucille Killewald 
Juanita Casullo 
Virginnia Brown 
Christine Kurbiel 
Della Galloway 
Paul Pochepon 
Marie Stier 
Donald Swartz 
James Lukasik 
Grace Wokersien 
Arleen McLean 
Adele Wawrznek 
Cynthia Hularz 
Donna Hale 
Virginia Martin 
Kathleen Starkey 
Jane Tylec 

Kenneth & Donna Braun 
Loretta Adams 
Mr. & Mrs. William Jolbert 
Mr. George Bolvin 
Mr. Richard Morris 



Joel Wright 
Mike Garonoski 
Mary Mondock 
Kim Prims 
Michael Siemucha 
Ruby Olgiati j 
Donna Loffredo 
Lauren Andres 
Mrs. Carole Beebe 
Mrs. Marion Androshat 
Mrs. Masters 
John Fretthold 
Barry Rousell 
Helen Kowalski 
Mrs Hempel 
Gregg Schnitzer 
Sidney Tryell 
Richard Badger 
Walt Yaro 
Mark Andres 
Paul Slowinski 
Charles Mazar 




Joseph Zinni 



Mike Glynn 



= E 

FRIENDS OF 

NORTH TONAWANDA 



Craig J. Bubb 


David & Julie Newman 


Robert Zayatz 


Mrs. Sharon Kronock 


David Batt 


Leon Zengierski 


Kevin Mahoney 


Angelo Miano 


David Bishop 


John & Rosemarie KOLB & family 


Joseph Scott 


Joanne Privitera 


Allan Fronczak 


John Record 


Mr. Malinowski 


Ken Anderson 


Anne Siegfried 


Ron S'DAO 


Alma Hu men 


Jeff Guido 


Richard Stenzel 


Mr. Benzino 


Don Kopf 


Mrs William Fire 


Mrs. Tyler 


Alice Idziok 


Jim, Gail, Kelly & Melissa Heft 


Valerie Treichler 


Anthony DeFelice 


Rosemarie Spyra 


Lorraine Morrou 


Mark Croop 


Alan Szaflarski 


Lois Doebler 


Bruce Reichmuth 


Nancy Snopkowski 


The Greenburg Family 


Mr. Robert Brown 


Charles Cino 


Mr. Francis Brody 


Charles Henderson 


Mr. Nelson Broeker 


Nancy Kramer 


Mr. Fisher 


David & Mary Bryant 


Mr. Ed Pitz 






£ 



Mr. & Mrs. Steven Huttenaier 



Mrs. Dean Carhart 




. 

'* 





















Parting Shots: The advertising sales staff would like to 
take this opportunity to thank once again the many fine 
people, business and professional, without whose 
support and help this book would have been impossible. 
As another way of thanking all of the contributors 
PLEASE patronize our advertisers. 




THE SALES AND PRODUCTION STAFF OF 
SHOW PRODUCTIONS 

Jim & Sue Kretz, 

Keith Maynard, Bill Dressier, 

Don Rice, Lisa Krowka, 

Dave Haskell, Wayne Hulin, 

Emmett Green, Greg Czechowicz, 

Greg Veihdeffer, & Alex O’Toole. 






Another special thank-you for his high-tech equipment 
and expert techno advice goes out to 'All-Star Randy' 

- 



1 S 




'i ' 

Although the publisher and producer make their best effort to assure the accuracy of the contents, they assume 
no responsibility for any incorrect information submitted by advertisers and/or patrons. 




Tl)e Knights of Columbus of North Ti onawanda 
bAabonna Council #2535 
says thank you for your many efforts 
on behalf of our community. 




"People helping people gets it done." 
"May God Bless!!" 





P of C JfeJwnna (Emntril 



IM.T. Catholic Club 

Specializing in Weddings and Banquets 

755 Erie Avenue 
N. Tonawanda, NY 14120 



Richard Vivian - 695-1 950 
Tony Smeragliuolo